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Hedging plants, shelterbelt and woodland trees
   
Hedging Plants, Shelterbelt and Woodland Trees Price List Winter 2016/17
  Unit Price (euro)
1 tree 2-9 trees 10-49 trees 49-199 trees 200+ trees
Barerooted trees/bushes (supplied February-April 2017)
Conifers and Ginkgo
Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) seed-grown 2yr 40-70cm
7.00
5.00
4.20
3.60
P.O.A.
Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) seed-grown 3yr 70-100cm
12.50
10.00
8.90
8.20
P.O.A.
Pine, Lodgepole (Pinus cortorta) 2+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Pine, Scots (Pinus sylvestris) 2+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Broadleaves
Alder, Common (Alnus glutinosa) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.35
1.04
0.80
Alder, Red (Alnus rubra)1+1 80-120cm
n/a
4.00
2.81
2.25
1.80
Apple, Crab (Malus sylvestris)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.28
1.82
1.40
Aronia, Galicjanja (A. prunifolia Galicjanja) 50-80cm
5.70
4.70
4.20
3.60
P.O.A.
Birch, Downy (Betula pubescens)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Blackthorn (Prunus Spinosa)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.35
1.04
0.80
Cherry, Wild (Prunus avium)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Cherry, Bird (Prunus padus)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Cockspur Thorn (Crataegus prunifolia)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.25
1.80
Dogwood (Cornus sanguinea)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Eleagnus (Eleagnus umbellata) 1+0 30-50cm
n/a
n/a
2.54
1.95
1.50
Eleagnus (Eleagnus umbellata) 1+1 50-80cm
6.00
5.00
4.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Hawthorn (Crateagus monogyna)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.35
1.04
0.80
Hawthorn (Crateagus monogyna)1+2 100-140cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Hazel, Common (Corylus avelana)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Hazel, Turkish (Corylus colurna) 2+0 80-100cm
6.00
5.00
4.38
3.50
2.80
Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanium) 1+1 60-90cm
n/a
n/a
2.28
1.82
1.40
Lime, Small-leaved (Tilia cordata)1+1 80-120cm
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
2.00
Lime, Small-leaved (Tilia cordata) 2+1 120-160cm
6.00
5.00
4.50
3.20
P.O.A.
Maple, Field (Acer campestre)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax) 1+1 30-60cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.25
1.80
Oak, Sessile (Quercus petraea) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.25
1.80
Poplar, White (Populus alba) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Robinia (Robinia pseudoacacia) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.28
1.82
1.40
Rose, Eglantine (Rosa rubiginosa) 1+1 60-100cm
7.00
6.00
4.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Rose, Ramanas (Rosa rugosa) 1+1 50-80cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides)1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides) 2+1 100-140cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.25
1.80
Service Tree (Sorbus domestica) 1+0 50-80cm
7.00
6.00
5.50
4.38
3.50
Spindle (Euonymous europaeus) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.28
1.82
1.40
Sweet Chestnut, European (Castanea sativa) 2+1 100-140cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.34
1.80
Sweet Chestnut, Hybrid (C.crenata x C.sativa) 2+1 100-140cm
n/a
n/a
4.38
3.50
2.80
Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatinus) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Walnut, Black (Juglans nigra) 1+1 80-100cm
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
2.00
Walnut, Hybrid (J. nigra x regia) 2+0 60-90cm
n/a
n/a
7.40
6.60
5.96
Walnut, Hybrid (J. nigra x regia) 2+1 90-120cm
n/a
n/a
9.50
8.25
7.40
Walnut, Hybrid (J. nigra x regia) 2+1 120-160cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.00
9.20
Walnut, European (Juglans regia)1+1 80-100cm
n/a
n/a
3.91
3.13
2.50
Whitebeam, Common (Sorbus aria) 2+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
2.00
Whitebeam, Swedish (Sorbus intermedia) 1+1 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.81
2.25
1.80
Willow, Eared (Salix autita) 1+0 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.95
1.56
1.20
Willow, Goat (Salix caprea) 1+0 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Willow, Grey (Salix cinera) 1+0 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
1.69
1.30
1.00
Willow, Creeping (Salix repens)1+0 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
2.28
1.82
1.40
 
Container-grown trees/bushes (supplied all year round subject to availability)
  Unit Price (euro)
1 tree 2 trees 3-9 trees 10-49 trees 50-199 trees 200 trees+
Conifers
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 2yr P9 20-30cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
6.90
6.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 3yr 3l airpot 30-50cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 4yr 9l airpot 50cm+
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
16.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 5yr 25l airpot 80cm+
50.00
45.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
P.O.A.
Swamp Cypress, Chinese (Glyptostrobus pensulis) 2yr 1l airpot 7-12cm
6.50
5.50
5.00
4.38
3.50
P.O.A.
Redwood, Dawn (Metasequoia glyptostroides) P9 2yr 12-20cm
n/a
5.73
4.93
4.13
3.50
2.80
Pine, Swiss Stone (Pinus cembra) P9 2yr 7-12cm
n/a
5.00
4.30
3.60
3.00
2.40
Pine, Chilgoza (Pinus gerardiana) 2yr 12-20cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
n/a
n/a
Pine, Korean (Pinus korsaiensis) 2yr 12-20cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
n/a
n/a
Pine, Macedonian (Pinus peuce) P9 2yr 12-20cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
2.00
Pine, Maritime (Pinus pinaster) 2yr, 3l, 40-60cm*
6.50
5.50
5.00
4.38
3.50
P.O.A.
Pine, Maritime (Pinus pinaster) 3yr, 9l, 60-90cm*
6.50
5.50
5.00
4.38
3.50
P.O.A.
Pine, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 3yr 25-40cm*
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
6.50
5.90
Pine, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 3yr 40-60cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
8.50
Pine, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 4yr 60-90cm*
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pine, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 5yr 90cm+*
50.00
45.00
40.00
35.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pine, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 6yr 120cm+*
100.00
90.00
80.00
70.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pine, Dwarf Siberian (Pinus pumila) P9 2yr 5-10cm
n/a
5.00
4.30
3.60
3.00
2.40
Pine, Digger (Pinus sabiniana) 2yr 15-25cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
n/a
n/a
Pine, Siberian (Pinus siberica) 2yr 10-12cm*
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
6.50
5.90
Pine, Siberian (Pinus siberica) 3yr 12-20cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
8.50
Pine, Blue (Pinus wallichiana ) P9 2yr 12-20cm
n/a
5.00
4.30
3.60
3.00
2.40
Broadleaves
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 1 yr P9
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.20
2.60
2.20
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 2 yr, 3l
8.00
7.00
6.50
5.90
5.40
4.80
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 3 yr, 5l
12.50
11.20
10.00
8.90
8.20
P.O.A.
Holly (Ilex aquifolium) 2 yr, P9 30-45cm *
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
2.00
Holly (Ilex aquifolium) 3 yr, 3l 40-60cm *
6.50
5.50
5.00
4.38
3.50
P.O.A.
Holly (Ilex aquifolium) 4 yr, 7l 60-90cm*
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
6.50
5.90
Holly (Ilex aquifolium) 5 yr, 12l 90-120cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax) 2yr 1l airpot 40-60cm
6.50
5.50
5.00
4.38
3.50
P.O.A.
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 1yr, plugs *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.13
2.50
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 2yr, 1l airpot 25-40cm *
7.00
6.00
5.40
4.80
4.30
3.90
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 3yr, 3l airpot 40-60cm*
10.00
8.50
7.30
6.50
5.90
5.40
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 4yr, 9l airpot 60-90cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
8.50
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 1yr, plugs *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.50
2.80
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 2yr 1l airpot 25-40cm *
7.00
6.00
5.40
4.80
4.30
3.90
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 3yr, 3l airpot 40-60cm*
10.00
8.50
7.30
6.50
5.90
5.40
Gorse, European (Ulex europaeus) 3 yr 5l 40-70cm*
8.00
7.00
6.50
5.50
4.70
P.O.A.
             

Key to container sizes: P9 pots are approx 9cm x 9cm x 9cm high. All other pots are numbered according to their size in litres. For example 3l indicates a 3 litre pot.

*These items can be shipped, but will be removed from their containers and sent barerooted (barerooted season only). They can be collected from the nursery all year round.

The benefits of shelter

The shelter effect of a windbreak extends on the lee side for a distance of up to thirty times the height of the windbreak. However, significant shelter is only achieved to about one third to one half of that distance. At a distance of ten times the height of the shelter, wind speeds are reduced by about 40-60 percent while at a distance of fifteen times the height the reduction is 25-35 percent. The potential damage caused by wind is roughly proportional to its power, which in turn is equivalent to the cube of the wind speed. In simple terms, this means that a reduction in wind speed of 25 percent reduces the potential damage by 55-60 percent.

Shelter not only reduces the possibility of wind damage, it also creates a warmer, more favourable micro-climate. In Ireland, wind is a major climatic limiting factor, not just for fruit and nut production but many other crops too.

When estimating distances of useful shelter, the reference height should be based on the upper part of the denser vegetation in the shelterbelt, not the highest point.  Thus the reference height of a shelterbelt of deciduous trees that reaches a maximum height of seven or eight metres may be only about five metres. 

To be most effective, shelterbelts should provide shelter to within one metre of the ground. Denser foliage generally provides greater wind reduction, though coniferous plantations may obstruct the wind so effectively that turbulence is created.  Also conifers also increase winter time humidity in the lee of the protection, increasing potential disease risks to orchard trees.

Broadleaved trees and shrubs provide much greater habitat opportunities for wildlife. In order to provide effective shelter, broadleaved shelterbelts should be 5-10 metres deep. Conifers are only advised for shelter in very extreme locations (the correct choice of conifer is very important too). Particularly good in the most extreme locations is New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax). Also very good is the common gorse, a very tough native shrub that many farmers spend their lives trying to pull out!

On exposed sites , a tapered profile is preferred, with the smaller shrubs on the outside faces, and larger trees in the middle.  Where the exposure is not too severe, a simple hedge may suffice or double line of trees may suffice. Hedges are most effective when a double row is planted, with trees staggered between rows.

Hedging plants, shelterbelt and woodland trees

Conifers and Ginkgo

Edible Pine Species

Pinus cembra

Pinus cembra , the Arolla stone pine, is native to the Alps and Carpathians, where it grows at a higher altitude than any other conifer. It is a very tough tree, capable of thriving in barren stony soil. In its harsh native environment it can take decades to reach nut-bearing age but when cultivated the first nuts appear at about twelve years. Requires well-drained soil. Slow growing, eventually reaching ten to twenty metres. For best results, plant more than one tree. Available March 2017

Pinus cembroides

Pinus cemboides , the Mexican pinyon, is native to the North Central Mexico and Southwest Texas, where it grows at an altitude of 1500-2600 metres. Closely related to Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla (below). In Mexico, the nuts are an important crop. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Requires very well-drained soil. Not available

Pinus monophylla

Pinus monophylla , the Single-leaf pinyon, is native to the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico, where it grows at an altitude of 1500-2600 metres. Closely related to Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla. The tree is surprisingly adapatable, and large specimen trees can be found on favourable sites in the UK. Cold tolerant to -20°C. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. However, this species is the most promising of the three pinyons listed here. Requires very well-drained soil. Available March 2018

Pinus edulis

Pinus edulis , the Rocky Mountain pinyon, is native to Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico. Closely related to Pinus monophyla and Pinus cembroides. Grows in arid upland environments. Cold tolerant to -25°C. In the past, important food crop for indigenous peoples. It is a very tough and long-lived tree, capable of thriving in near-desert conditions and living for 750 years or more. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Requires very well-drained soil. Not available

Pinus gerardiana

Pinus gerardiana , the Chilgoza pine, is native to Kashmir, Eastern Afghanistan, Baluchistan (Pakistan) and Southern Tibet where it grows at between 2000 and 3500 metres above sea level. In the regions where the indigenous forests prevail, the Chilgoza pinenuts are an important economic crop, but lack of regeneration from over-grazing, combined with over-harvesting and the cutting down of trees for fuel have put the tree at risk and it is now on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In its native environment, t he tree is slow growing, eventually reaching 10-20 metres.

The Chilgoza pine is likely to grow well in Ireland but will do best on well-drained sites. Nut-producing capability is unknown, but seems likely. Available October 2017

Pinus coulteri

Pinus coulteri , the Coulter pine, is native to coastal ranges of southern California and northwest Mexico. Closely related to Pinus sabiniana and Pinus torreyana. Known to be adaptable to colder climates and tolerant of high rainfall. Cold tolerant to -15°C. The Coulter pine makes a small tree with a broad crown. In its native environment it can eventually reach 15-20m, occasionally 25m. The cones are very large and can sometimes weigh 2kg. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Available March 2018

Pinus torreyana

Pinus torreyana , the Soledad pine, is a very rare pine native to Santa Rosa island and several cliff sites in San Diego county, California. Closely related to Pinus sabiniana and Pinus coulteri. The Soledad pine is a small tree, rarely exceeding 15m. It is not very cold tolerant and will be damaged by temperatures below -6°C. In Ireland, only suitable for mild maritime environments. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Available March 2018

Pinus sabiniana

Pinus sabiniana , the Digger pine, is native to the coastal ranges of California. Closely related to Pinus torreyana and Pinus coulteri. Formerly an important food crop for the indigenous Maidu tribes (Digger Indians). The Digger pine is a small tree, typically reaching about 15m in its native environment. It is adapatable to a wide range of climates and soils. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain, but quite promising. Available October 2017

Pinus koraiensis

Pinus koraiensis , the Korean stone pine, is native to Korea, Northern China, the Pacific coast of Russia, and Northern Japan. Closely related to Pinus siberica, but thought to be more adaptable to Irish conditions. It should produce the first nuts after about 10 years. Can tolerate a wide range of soils. Will grow into a large tree. Also valuable for timber. For best results, plant more than one tree. Available October 2017

Pinus pinea

Pinus pinea, the Medierranean stone pine, grows well in Ireland and will produce the first nuts after 8-10 years. It is a tough hardy tree, tolerant of frost to -15°C. It will grow in any well-drained soil. Very good in coastal locations. This is by far the best choice of pinenut tree for Ireland. Slow growing with spreading habit. Also valuable for fuel. For best results for nuts, plant a minimum of 3-4 trees. In stock

Pinus pumila

Pinus pumila, the dwarf Siberian pine, is native to the Russian Pacific coast, Northern Japan and parts of Korea and China. Closely related to Pinus koraiensis and Pinus siberica. It forms a dwarf tree or large shrub, occasionally reaching six metres. Compared to other pinenuts, the nuts are very small. Of the pinenut trees offered here, probably most suitable for harsh coastal situations. For best results plant more than one tree. Available March 2017

Pinus siberica

Pinus siberica, the Siberian stone pine, is closely related to Pinus cembra, the Swiss Stone Pine, but produces larger nuts. It is a long-lived tree (c500 years) that in its native environment can grow to 30 metres. Although it has evolved to cope with the extreme temperature variations of Siberia and Mongolia, it appears quite comfortable in cool temperate climates. Known to be growing in coastal regions of some Baltic countries. Nut-producing capability in Ireland is unproven, but appears possible. Probably best on a cold upland site. The first cones should appear after about 15 years. Also valuable for timber and fuel. For best results plant more than one tree. In stock

Other Pines

Pinus contorta - Lodgepole Pine

Native to the Pacific coast of North America. Medium to large tree, typical maximum height 20-30m. One of the toughest pines, often used as a shelter tree for other conifers. Tolerant of very acid ground and wet soils, good in exposed situations, including coastal areas. Also quite tolerant of dry soils. Sometimes known as Beach Pine. In very tough locations grows more like a shrub, and can be broader than tall. Available March 2017

Pinus peuce - Macedonian Pine

Native to Albania, Macedonia, southwest Bulgaria and northern Greece. Medium top large tree typical maximum height 20-30m. A very tough pine, often used as a shelter tree for other conifers though rarely planted in Ireland. Tolerant of a wide range of soils including acid peat and shallow limstone soils. Good in exposed situations, including coastal areas. Also tolerant of cold sites, including frost pockets . Available February 2017

Pinus pinaster - Maritime Pine

Native to the central and western Mediterrean and Atlantic seaboard of Europe as far north as Normandy. Large tree reaching 35-40m in favourable locations. A tough pine, very good in coastal exposure. In the UK hardy as far north as Edinburgh. Tolerant of very dry ground and will grow in almost pure sand. Available February 2017

Pinus sylvestris - Scots Pine

Native to Ireland. Large tree, typical maximum height 25-35m. Quite hardy, good for exposed upland locations but requires relatively dry soil. One of the most attractive of the pines. Given space the tree develop a wide crown. On dry ground, potentially long lived - there are trees in the Cairngorms in Scotland around 500 years old. 3 yr trees, barerooted, (60-100 cm high). Available March 2017

Pinus wallichiana (syn P.griffithi) - Blue Pine

Native to the Himalayan mountains from Arunachal Pradesh in northern India westwards into Afghanistan. Medium to large tree reaching 35m in favourable native locations. The likely maximum height in Ireland is 20-25m. As the name suggests, the blue pine has distinctive foliage varying in colour from green grey to bright blue. Often uses for ornamental plantings. Quite a fast growing tree but requires sheltered situations to do well. Sometimes used as a rootstock for grafting slower growing pine species (for example Pinus koraiensis). Available February 2017

 

Other Conifers

Araucaria araucana - Monkey Puzzle

The Monkey Puzzle tree (Araucaria araucana) is a coniferous tree sometimes known as the Araucarian or Chilean pine, although it is not actually a pine species. It is the hardiest member of the genus Araucaria, in the Araucariaceae family, the other members of which are found widely scattered in Oceania, northern Australia and parts of South America. The Monkey Puzzle is native to the south-central Andes, the main habitat region being situated at latitudes between 37.5 and 39.5ºS. It is found mainly on the Chilean side, typically above 1000m altitudes. The climate is mild temperate and annual rainfall is 1250-1750mm (occasionally 2000mm).

In their native habitat Monkey Puzzle trees can grow up to 48m high and live for over 1200 years. Mature trees produce large cones, each of which contains up to 200 nuts. The nuts are both tasty and nutritious and have been long prized as a food by indigenous peoples. In the wild, trees begin to produce nuts at around 30-40 years. However, there is strong evidence that container-raised trees begin flowering much earlier in life (early flowering in a common phenomena in container-grown trees and is due to root stress). The first flowers have been recorded on some domestic Monkey Puzzle trees at 12-15 years. The trees are dioecious, meaning the female and male reproductive parts are on different trees.

Popular as an ornamental tree, the Monkey Puzzle has been planted in many northern hemisphere countries and is found growing well as far north as 63ºN in western Norway. It will tolerate wet maritime climates, acid peat, salt exposure, and winter temperatures down to -20°C. In stock

Glyptostrobus pensilis - Chinese Swamp Cypress (NEW)

Native to southeast China where it grows into an attractive small to medium sized tree, typical maximum height 15-20m. Thrives in wet conditions. In its native habitat it can be found growing in standing water. Often planted in China to stablise river banks. Considered hardy to Zone 8, hardiest in wet locations. Will often fail on dry sites. Deciduous (loses needles in the autumn). The Chinese Swamp Cypress has no history of being grown in Ireland but our research indicates it has great potential, particularly on wet inland sites. The trees offered are raised from seed at our nursery here in Westport. Available October 2017

Metasequoia glyptosroboides - Dawn Redwood (NEW)

Native to the Hubei province in east central China. Found in fossil reamins by Victorian archaeologists in fossil remains but long thought to be extinct. Live trees were first discovered in Hubei and Sichuan in China in 1941. By Norther American redwood standards the Dawn Redwood is the considered small but here 'small' is a relative term as trees frequently grow to 40-45m, with the tallest reaching 60m. The first Dawn Redwood trees were planted in Europe in the late 1940s and the 50s and some of these trees have now reached 35m or more (the tallest - in Germany - was 39m in 2013). In Ireland the maximum height attainable is likely to be about 30m. There is a large specimen at Birr Castle.

The Dawn Redwood does best on damp sites and will tolerate waterlogged and boggy conditions. In the past many growers made the mistake of planting it on dry ground, where it struggled. It makes an especially attractive tree with lovely autumn colours and like the Chinese Swamp Cypress above is deciduous. Available February 2017

 

Broadleaves - bareooted

Acer campestre - Field Maple

Native to the UK, naturalised in Ireland. Makes medium sized tree, prefers dry sites. Spectacular reddish-brown autumn foliage. Available February 2017

Acer pseudoplatinus - Sycamore

Medium to large tree, native to central and southern Europe but long naturalised in Ireland. Very hardy, tolerant of a wide range of soils and climates. Good for exposed coastal situations where other broadleaved trees struggle to get established.. Can be coppiced, very good for firewood. Available February 2017

Aesculus hippocastanum - Horse Chestnut

Lage tree, native to Balkans, long nauturalised in Ireland. When in flower, one of Ireland's prettiest trees. Important bee plant. Produces the familiar conkers in the autumn. Available February 2017

Alnus glutinosa - Common Alder

Fast growing tree often used in shelterbelts. Good nitrogen fixer. Leaves make excellent compost. Responds better to coppicing than most other alders. Best planted closely and thinned out as trees develop. Will grow in most soils: good in waterlogged ground but also very tolerant of dry soils. Available February 2017

Alnus rubra - Red Alder

Very vigrorous tree, can grow to 20m. Good nitrogen fixer. Leaves make excellent compost. Best planted closely and thinned out as trees develop. Will grow in most soils. In stock

Aronia prunifolia Galicjanja - Aronia

Shrub native to Northern Asia and North America, long bred for its richly flavoured berries used in fruit juices and jams, or eaten raw. When used as hedging, plant in staggered double rows, 1.2-1.5m between plants (0.8-1.2m with Hugin ). Plant rows 1-1.2m apart.

Very frost hardy (won't be killed off by a repeat of December 2010), tolerant of most soils. Does not compete well with weeds during establishment. Not suitable for very exposed maritime situations.

Vigorous cultivar reputedly closely related to mitschurinii. Grown commercially in Baltic states. Big crops of large, sweet, juicy berries, rich in vitamin C. 1.2-1.6m high. Can be grown as medium-sized hedge or as stand-alone plants. Sold out

Betula pubescens - Downy Birch

Native to Ireland. Medium sized tree, typical maximum height 15-20m. Tougher than silver birch, suitable for exposed upland areas, quite good on dry acid soils. Available February 2017

Carpinus betulus - Hornbeam

Native to Ireland. Medium to large tree, typical maximum height 20-30m. Fast growing, suitable for coppicing, fairly tolerant of exposure (not as tough as sessile oak). In stock

Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut

The seedlings have been raised at our own nursery from seed originating in England. Unlike the named cultivars of Castanea sativa, these seed-grown trees are very unlikely to produce good crops of nuts. However they will grow into fine large specimen trees suitable for fuel, stakes or posts or timber production. They may also be used for grafting purposes. In stock

Castanea crenata x sativa - Sweet Chestnut hybrids

These have been raised at our own nursery from seed originating in England. They are the seed of trees regarded as stable hybrids between the European and Japanese chestnut. Like the seed grown trees of Castanea sativa, listed above, these trees are unlikely to produce crops of nuts comparable to trees propagated from named varieties by vegetative means.Neverthless. the seed will carry some good nut bearing characteristics.

Most Castanea crenata x sativa hybrids are more vigorous and more disease resistant than C.sativa, and are generally a better choice than C.sativa for use as rootstocks for named cultivars. In stock

Cornus sanguinea - Dogwood

Shrub (sometimes growing into a small tree) native to Ireland. Prefers well drained, non-acid soil. Black fruit, popular with birds. Available February 2017

Corylus avellana - Common Hazel

Native hazel. Good for coppicing for poles and/or for fuel, also good habitat for wildlife. Possible pollinator for cobuts. Nut production is generally low compared to cobnuts. Can be grown as a hedge. The male flowers (catkins) are attractive to bees. Tolerates most soils. 2 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high). In stock

Corylus colurna - Turkish Hazel

Unlike the native hazelnut, the Turkish hazelnut grows into a medium size tree (15-20m). Fast growing attractive tree. In good years, will produce nuts in Irish conditions.

Crataegus monogyna - Whitethorn/Hawthorn

Native thorn, traditionally used for hedging (completely stock-proof when properly laid). Very hardy, suitable for exposed upland situations. Berries popular with birds. Berries, flowers and leaves have medicinal properties. Can also be used as rootstock for pears. Available February 2017

Crataegus prunifolia - Cockspur Thorn

North American thorn, closely related to C.crus-galli (true Cockspur thorn) and C.macrcantha. Makes small compact tree up to about 5m high. Good for hedges and shelterbelts. Very hardy, suitable for exposed upland situations. Large red berries can be used for fruit leathers and jams. The trees can also be used as rootstock for pear (very disease resistant). Available February 2017

Eleagnus umbellata - Eleagnus (Autumn Olive)

 

Hardy fast growing shrub, best known for its tasty edible berries. Popular in hedging and in forest garden projects. Also nitrogen fixing. Very tolerant of seaside exposure. Highly recommended. In stock

 

Euonymous europaeus - Spindle

Small tree orlarge shrub, native to Ireland but rare. Preferes lime-rich soils. Produces spectacular pink fruits, with orange foliage in the autumn. Supplied as 2yr trees (60-100cm). Available February 2017

Hippophae rhamnoides - Sea Buckthorn

Seed-grown Sea Buckthorn is suitable for hedging situations where fruit production is of secondary importance. Very wind resistant and frost hardy. Requires well-drained ground. A good choice for the most exposed site. Random mixture of male and female plants. Available February 2017

Juglans nigra - Black Walnut

Valuable timber tree, very good alternative to Ash now that the Ash Dieback disease has arrived in Ireland. Used in furniture-making, veneers, high aesthetic value. Needs deep well-drained soils. Long-lived. Unlikely to produce nuts in Ireland. In stock

Juglans nigra x regia - Hybrid Walnut

Very fast growing tree (more vigorous than Juglans nigra) with excellent timber potential in Ireland (not suitable for nut production). Ideal for agro-forestry projects. Recommended. In stock

Juglans regia - Common Walnut

Valuable timber tree. Used in furniture-making, veneers, high aesthetic value. Long-lived. May produce nuts in Ireland at 15-20 years (10-20 percent likelihood) but a poor choice for nut production compared to grafted walnut trees. In stock

Malus sylvestris - Crab Apple

Native crab apple. Will grow in most well drained soils. Attractive flowers, important bee tree, good pollinator for domestic apple trees. Available February 2017

Populus alba - White Poplar

Medium sized tree, native to mainland Europe, naturalised in Ireland. Very hardy. Good for wet and waterlogged sites, and exposed locations. Suckers freely, can become invasive. Available February 2017

Prunus avium - Wild Cherry

Native tree. Very hardy and will grow in most well drained soils. Makes medium to large tree. Attractive flowers, important bee tree, good for birds. 2 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high). Available February 2017

Prunus padus - Wild Cherry

Native tree. Very hardy and will grow in most well drained soils. Makes small to medium sized tree. Attractive flowers, important bee tree, good for birds. Unlike Prunus avium, does not sucker. 2 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high). Available February 2017

Prunus spinosa - Blackthorn

Native thorn, related to the plum and damson. Extremely hardy, good for hedges and shelterbelts. Suitable for exposed upland situations. The astringent fruits (sloes) can used for fruit leathers and jams. In Scandinavia, the fruit are used for fermenting into alcohol. Will grow in most soils, except waterlogged ones, Can be invasive when not maintained. The trees can also be used as rootstock for fruiting species of prunus including plum, damson and cherry (very disease resistant). Produces lots of suckers, can be invasive if not properly managed. Available February 2017

Quercus petraea - Sessile Oak

Native to Ireland, including Western regions. Large tree, typical maximum height 40m (in tough locations the tree will rarely exceed 20m). The toughest of the medium or large deciduous trees, will tolerate exposure and poor soils. There is a small area of indigenous woodland on the Killary in West Mayo. In stock

Robinia pseudoacacia - Robinia (Black Locust Tree)

Medium to large tree, native to North America, naturalised in some parts of the UK. In a good year, spectacular flowers, popular with bees. Grown in warmer climates for the production of acacia honey. Fast growing, good for timber production, produces quality firewood, can be coppiced. Also a nitrogen fixer. Available February 2017

Rosa rubiginosa - Eglantine Rose

Famed for its intoxicating scent and fragrant apple-scented foliage since Roman times and immortalised in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Small to medium-sized climbing rose. Good in hedges or trailed on banks

'I know a bank where the wild thyme grows, where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine, with sweet musk roses and eglantine'

Delicate pink flowers followed by red hips. In stock

Rosa rugosa - Ramanas Rose

Strongly growing, spreading shrub producing beautiful fragrant flowers followed by large red hips. In stock

Salix aurita - Eared Willow

Native to Ireland. Small to medium sized shrub, maximum height typically 2m. Upland species, very hardy and wind tolerant, good for windbreaks in very exposed locations. Available February 2017

Salix caprea - Goat Willow

Native to Ireland. Small to medium sized tree, maximum height typically 12m. Common tree, adaptable to wide variety of soils and conditons including wetlands. 1 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high). Available February 2017

Salix cinerea - Grey Willow

Native to Ireland. Large shrub or small tree, maximum height typically 6m. Very tough and adaptable, suitable for wetlands, upland areas, land reclamation projects, poor soils, and coastal locations. 1 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high): Available February 2017

Salix repens - Creeping Willow

Native to Ireland. Small shrub, maximum height typically 1.5m. Coastal species, very hardy and wind tolerant, good for windbreaks in very exposed locations. Will grow in sand dunes. 1 yr trees, barerooted (60-100 cm high): Available February 2017

Sorbus aria - Whitebeam

Small to medium sized tree related to Rowan. Very tough and hardy, good for exposed upland locations, also tolerant of urban pollution. Produces small berries similar to Rowan. Can be used as rootstock for pear. Available February 2017

Sorbus aucuparia - Rowan

Small to medium sized tree related to Whitebeam. Very hardy, good for exposed upland locations and poor ground. Large crops of small berries loved by birds. Can be used as rootstock for pear (very disease resistant). Available February 2017

Sorbus domestica - Service tree

Rare tree related to Mountain Ash and Whitebeam native to central Europe. Produces aromatic, crab-apple like fruit 3-4cm across. Available March 2017

Sorbus intermedia - Swedish Whitebeam

Small to medium sized tree related to Rowan and Whitebeam. Very tough and hardy, good for exposed upland locations, also tolerant of urban pollution. Produces small berries similar to Rowan. Can be used as rootstock for pear (very disease resistant). In stock

Tilia cordata - Small Leaved Lime

Native to Europe though not Ireland. Makes medium to large tree, somewhat smaller and more compact than T. x europaea (common lime) or T.platyphyllos (broad-leaved lime). Good as specimen tree, but can be coppiced. Young leaves are edible, good in salads. Leaves also very good for composts or animal feed. Valuable bee tree. Best in relatively sheltered location, on well-drained ground. Available as 2 yr trees (80-120cm) and 3 yr trees (120-160cm). In stock

 

Container-grown plants and trees

Aronia

Shrub native to Northern Asia and North America, long bred for its richly flavoured berries used in fruit juices and jams, or eaten raw. When used as hedging, plant in staggered double rows, 1.2-1.5m between plants (0.8-1.2m with Hugin ). Plant rows 1-1.2m apart. Very frost hardy (won't be killed off by a repeat of December 2010), tolerant of most soils. Does not compete well with weeds during establishment. Wind resistant but not suitable for very exposed maritime situations.

Aronia mitschurinii

Russian variety developed by Ivan Michurin, cultivated widely in Russia. Upright shrub, growing to 4 m in ten years. The most vigorous of the berry-producing aronias. Large sweet and juicy berries. Not available 2016/17

Aronia prunifolia Nero 

Vigorous Russian cultivar with large, sweet, juicy berries rich in vitamin C. Grows 1.4-2m high. Can be grown as low hedge, great for borders round vegetable or soft fruit gardens. Very ornamental foliage in autumn. In stock

Aronia prunifolia Viking                                         
Vigorous North American cultivar with big crops of large, sweet, juicy berries, rich in vitamin C. Slightly more vigorous that Nero. 1.5-2.25m high. Can be grown as medium-sized hedge or as stand-alone plants. Very ornamental foliage in autumn. In stock

Ilex aquifolium - Holly

Native holly. Very hardy, good for exposed upland situations, hedges, shelterbelts or specimen trees. Very long lived. Berries much loved by birds. (both male and female plants required for berries). Tolerates most soils except waterlogged ones. In stock

Phormium Tenax - New Zealand Flax

Native to the New Zealand, naturalised in parts of Mayo and some other coastal regions of Ireland. Extremely tough, salt and wind resistant shrub, suitable for the most extreme locations. In stock

Quercus ilex - Holm Oak

Native to the Western Mediterranean, SW Europe, naturalised in parts of the UK, occasionally in Ireland. Magnificent tree, evergreen, typical maximum height 25m. Acorns edible, used as human and animal food for thousands of years. Very good in coastal situations, more wind and salt tolerant than most other oaks. In stock

Quercus suber - Cork Oak

Native to the Western Mediterranean, SW Europe. Small to medium sized tree, evergreen, typical maximum height 15m. Acorns edible, used as human and animal food for thousands of years. Will grow well in coastal areas of Ireland and the UK. Not tolerant of severe frost. Grown in Portugal and Spain to produce cork. In stock

Ulex europaeus - Gorse

Native to Ireland. Small to medium sized shrub, typical maximum height 2m. Very tolerant of dry soil, coastal exposure. Will grow in almost any soil (not waterlogged ones). Nitrogen fixer. Very good for providing shelter for young trees. Spectacular yellow flowers in early spring. In stock

 

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