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Nut Trees from Fruit and Nut (offering the largest range of nut trees in Ireland)
   

 

Nut Tree Price List 2017/18
  Unit price (euro)
1 tree 2 trees 3-9 trees 10-49 trees 50-199 trees 200+ trees
Barerooted trees (supplied November 2017-April 2018)
Almond maidens on St Julien A rootstock
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Almond 2 yr on St Julien A rootstock
36.00
32.00
29.00
26.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Cobnuts 1 yr, 40-60 cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.00
3.00
Cobnuts 2 yr, 60-100 cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
6.00
5.40
4.90
Cobnuts 3 yr, 100-140 cm
10.00
9.00
8.20
7.40
6.80
6.30
Cobnuts 3 yr, 140-180 cm
12.50
11.20
10.00
8.90
8.20
7.50
Cobnuts 4 yr, 100-140 cm
12.50
11.20
10.00
8.90
8.20
7.50
Cobnuts 4 yr, 140-180 cm
15.00
13.40
12.00
10.70
9.90
9.00
Cobnuts 4 yr, 180-220 cm
18.00
16.20
14.60
13.10
12.00
11.00
Cobnuts 5-6 yr, 220 cm +
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
n/a
n/a
Ginkgo, seed-grown 2yr 40-70cm
7.00
5.00
5.00
4.20
3.60
P.O.A.
Ginkgo, seed-grown 3yr 70-100cm
12.50
10.00
10.00
8.90
8.20
P.O.A.
Hazel, Turkish (Corylus colurna) 2yr 80-100cm
6.00
5.00
5.00
4.38
3.50
2.80
Heartnut/Buartnut named varieties 30-45 cm
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.00
P.O.A.
Heartnut/Buartnut named varieties 45-70 cm
29.00
27.00
24.50
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Heartnut/Buartnut named varieties 70-100 cm
36.00
32.00
29.00
26.50
23.50
P.O.A.
Heartnut/Buartnut named varieties 100-140 cm
45.00
40.00
36.00
33.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Heartnut/Buartnut named varieties 140-180 cm
60.00
54.00
48.00
44.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Hickory/Hican named varieties 30-45cm
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Hickory/Hican named varieties 45-70cm
38.00
34.00
31.00
28.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Hickory/Hican named varieties 70-100cm
45.00
40.00
36.00
33.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Hickory/Hican named varieties 100-140cm
60.00
52.50
48.00
44.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Sweet Chestnut named varieties 45-70 cm
20.00
18.00
16.50
14.90
12.90
12.00
Sweet Chestnut named varieties 70-100 cm
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
15.70
Sweet Chestnut named varieties 100-140 cm
36.00
32.00
29.00
26.00
24.00
P.O.A.
Sweet Chestnut named varieties 140-180 cm
45.00
40.00
36.00
33.00
30.00
P.O.A.
Walnut named varieties 45-70 cm
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
P.O.A.
Walnut named varieties 70-100 cm
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
22.00
19.70
Walnut named varieties 100-140 cm
38.00
34.00
31.00
28.00
25.00
P.O.A.
Walnut named varieties 140-180 cm
45.00
40.00
36.00
33.00
30.00
P.O.A.
Walnut named varieties 180 cm+
60.00
52.50
48.00
44.00
40.00
P.O.A.
Container-grown trees (available all year round) *
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 2yr P9 20-30cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
6.90
6.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 3yr 3l airpot 30-50cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 4yr 9l airpot 50cm+
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
16.50
P.O.A.
Monkey Puzzle (A.araucana) 4yr 9l airpot 80cm+
50.00
44.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Swiss Stone (Pinus cembra) 2yr 10-15cm*
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.60
3.00
2.40
Pinenut, Swiss Stone (Pinus cembra) 3yr 15-25cm*
8.40
7.40
6.50
6.00
5.60
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Coulter (Pinus coulteri) 2yr 20-30cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Chilgoza (Pinus gerardiana) 2yr 12-20cm
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Korean (Pinus korsaiensis) 3yr 15-25cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Piňon (Pinus monophylla) 2yr 10-15cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) plugs 15-25cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.60
3.00
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 2yr 25-40cm*
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
6.50
5.90
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 3yr 40-60cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
8.50
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 4yr 60-90cm
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
16.50
15.00
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 5yr 90-120cm
50.00
45.00
40.00
35.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Mediterranean (Pinus pinea) 6yr 120cm+
90.00
82.00
74.00
66.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Dwarf Siberian (Pinus pumila) 2yr 7-12cm*
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.60
3.00
2.40
Pinenut, Dwarf Siberian (Pinus pumila) 3yr 12-20cm
8.40
7.40
6.50
6.00
5.60
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Digger (Pinus sabiniana) 2yr 20-30cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Digger (Pinus sabiniana) 3yr 30-45cm
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
16.50
P.O.A.
Pinenut, Siberian (Pinus siberica) 2yr 12-20cm*
10.00
8.80
7.80
7.20
6.50
5.90
Pinenut, Siberian (Pinus siberica) 3yr 20-30cm*
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
9.50
8.50
Pinenut, Siberian (Pinus siberica) 4yr 30-50cm
25.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
16.50
P.O.A
Pinenut, Torrey (Pinus torreyana ) 2yr 20-30cm*
20.00
18.00
16.00
14.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 2yr, 1l airpot 25-40cm
7.00
6.00
5.40
4.80
4.30
3.90
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 3yr, 3l airpot 40-60cm
10.00
8.50
7.30
6.50
5.90
5.40
Oak, Holm (Quercus ilex ) 4yr, 9l airpot 60-90cm
15.00
13.50
12.00
10.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 1yr, plugs
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.50
2.80
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 2yr 1l airpot 25-40cm
7.00
6.00
5.40
4.80
4.30
3.90
Oak, Cork (Quercus suber) 3yr, 3l airpot 40-60cm
10.00
8.50
7.30
6.50
5.90
5.40
* plugs and P9s can normally only be shipped in multiples of 50 or more. Trees in 1l &3l airpots will be normally be removed from their containers and sent barerooted (barerooted season only). Trees in larger pots are normally collection only

 

Pinenuts - new for 2017/18

Globally, there are about twenty-five species of pine that produce nuts large enough to be considered for human food. The different species are well scattered: from Mexico and the United States to the Mediterranean, Central Europe and Eastern Asia. Economically, the most important species are Pinus pinea (Mediterranean countries), Pinus siberica (Russia and Mongolia), Pinus koraiensis (Korea and China) , Pinus gerardiana (Pakistan and India) and Pinus cembroides (Mexico). Other important nut species include Pinus cembra (Central Europe), Pinus monophylla, Pinus edulis, Pinus sabiniana, Pinus torreyana and Pinus coulteri (all southwestern United States).

In Ireland , Pinus pinea, Pinus albicaulis, Pinus koraiensis and Pinus cembra are the most likely to produce regular crops of nuts. All pinenut species are strongly outbreeding so single trees may not produce nuts. For best results plant 3-4 trees of the same species.

Pinus armandii, a pine species native to China, Bhutan and parts of Burma, is known to cause an unpleasant allergic reaction known as Pine Mouth (also called Pine Nut Syndrome). The main symptom is taste disturbance. Normally the symptoms last only a few days but in severe cases they can persist for weeks, occasionally months. Commercial pinenuts originating in Asia (including Eastern Russia) are sometimes adulterated with Pinus armandii. However, Pine Mouth has not been linked to any of the pine nut species listed above.

Pine trees are very adaptable. Of the 120 or so distinct species found worldwide, most would grow in Ireland. Pinus sylvestris (Scots Pine), which is considered native to Ireland, is thought to have originated in Central Northern Asia. It's found in the wild state across a vast swathe of territory stretching from Scotland to within a hundred kilometres of the Pacific Ocean in Eastern Russia, and from the Arctic Ocean southwards as far as Turkey and Spain. Its territory encompasses an astonishing range of climates. On this evidence alone, any of the nut-bearing species of pine are worth a try.

Edible Pine Species

Pinus albicaulis

Pinus albicaulis, the Whitebark pine, is native to the mountains of Western Canada and Northwestern United States. It is closely related to the other subalpine stone pines, namely Pinus cembra, koraiensis, pumila and siberica. normally forms a low spreading tree, but in harsh conditions may develop as a prostrate mat. The nuts are large and flavoursome. Hardiness Zone 4. Available March 2019

Pinus cembra

Pinus cembra , the Arolla stone pine, is native to the Alps and Carpathians, where it grows at a higher altitude than any other conifer. It is a very tough tree, capable of thriving in barren stony soil. In its harsh native environment it can take decades to reach nut-bearing age but when cultivated the first nuts appear at about twelve years. Requires well-drained soil. Slow growing, eventually reaching ten to twenty metres. Hardiness Zone 5. For best results, plant more than one tree. In stock

Pinus cembroides

Pinus cemboides , the Mexican pinyon, is native to the North Central Mexico and Southwest Texas, where it grows at an altitude of 1500-2600 metres. Closely related to Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla (below). In Mexico, the nuts are an important crop. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Requires very well-drained soil. Hardiness Zone 7. Available March 2019

Pinus coulteri

Pinus coulteri , the Coulter pine, is native to coastal ranges of southern California and northwest Mexico. Closely related to Pinus sabiniana and Pinus torreyana. Known to be adaptable to colder climates and tolerant of high rainfall. Cold tolerant to -15°C. The Coulter pine makes a small tree with a broad crown. In its native environment it can eventually reach 15-20m, occasionally 25m. The cones are very large and can sometimes weigh 2kg. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Hardiness Zone 7. Available March 2018

Pinus edulis

Pinus edulis , the Rocky Mountain pinyon, is native to Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico. Closely related to Pinus monophyla and Pinus cembroides. Grows in arid upland environments. Cold tolerant to -25°C. In the past, important food crop for indigenous peoples. It is a very tough and long-lived tree, capable of thriving in near-desert conditions and living for 750 years or more. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Requires very well-drained soil. Hardiness Zone 8. Available March 2019

Pinus gerardiana

Pinus gerardiana , the Chilgoza pine, is native to Kashmir, Eastern Afghanistan, Baluchistan (Pakistan) and Southern Tibet where it grows at between 2000 and 3500 metres above sea level. In the regions where the indigenous forests prevail, the Chilgoza pinenuts are an important economic crop, but lack of regeneration from over-grazing, combined with over-harvesting and the cutting down of trees for fuel have put the tree at risk and it is now on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In its native environment, t he tree is slow growing, eventually reaching 10-20 metres.

The Chilgoza pine is likely to grow well in Ireland but will do best on well-drained sites. Nut-producing capability is unknown, but seems likely. Hardiness Zone 7. Available November 2017

Pinus koraiensis

Pinus koraiensis , the Korean stone pine, is native to Korea, Northern China, the Pacific coast of Russia, and Northern Japan. Closely related to Pinus siberica, but thought to be more adaptable to Irish conditions. It should produce the first nuts after about 15 years. Can tolerate a wide range of soils. Will grow into a large tree. Also valuable for timber. For best results, plant more than one tree. Hardiness Zone 3. Available November 2017

Pinus maximartinezii

Pinus maximartinezii, the Large Martinez pine is an extremely rare pine found growing in only one location: at 1900-2200m on the slopes of a small mountain in Zacatas State in central Mexico. The locality experiences frost in winter. Pinus maximartinezii produces the largest nut of any pine species. The tree should grow well in sheltered coastal parts of Ireland especially within urban areas and possibly also in milder regions inland. Its ability to produce nuts in an Irish climate is uncertain. Worth considering as a novelty tree. Hardiness Zone 9b. Available March 2019

Pinus monophylla

Pinus monophylla , the Single-leaf pinyon, is native to the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico, where it grows at an altitude of 1500-2600 metres. Closely related to Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla. The tree is surprisingly adapatable, and large specimen trees can be found on favourable sites in the UK. Cold tolerant to -20°C. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. However, this species is the most promising of the three pinyons listed here. Requires very well-drained soil. Hardiness Zone 8. Available March 2018

Pinus pinea

Pinus pinea, the Medierranean stone pine, grows well in Ireland and will produce the first nuts after 8-10 years. It is a tough hardy tree, tolerant of frost to -15°C. It will grow in any well-drained soil. Very good in coastal locations. This is by far the best choice of pinenut tree for Ireland. Slow growing with spreading habit. Also valuable for fuel. For best results for nuts, plant a minimum of 3-4 trees. Hardiness Zone 8. In stock

Pinus pumila

Pinus pumila, the dwarf Siberian pine, is native to the Russian Pacific coast, Northern Japan and parts of Korea and China. Closely related to Pinus koraiensis and Pinus siberica. It forms a dwarf tree or large shrub, occasionally reaching six metres. Compared to other pinenuts, the nuts are very small. Of the pinenut trees offered here, probably most suitable for harsh coastal situations. For best results plant more than one tree. Hardiness Zone 5. In stock

Pinus sabiniana

Pinus sabiniana , the Digger pine, is native to the coastal ranges of California. Closely related to Pinus torreyana and Pinus coulteri. Formerly an important food crop for the indigenous Maidu tribes (Digger Indians). The Digger pine is a small tree, typically reaching about 15m in its native environment. It is adapatable to a wide range of climates and soils. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain, but quite promising. Hardiness Zone 8. Available September 2017

Pinus siberica

Pinus siberica, the Siberian stone pine, is closely related to Pinus cembra, the Swiss Stone Pine, but produces larger nuts. It is a long-lived tree (c500 years) that in its native environment can grow to 30 metres. Although it has evolved to cope with the extreme temperature variations of Siberia and Mongolia, it appears quite comfortable in cool temperate climates. Known to be growing in coastal regions of some Baltic countries. Nut-producing capability in Ireland is unproven, but appears possible. Probably best on a cold upland site. The first cones should appear after about 15 years. Also valuable for timber and fuel. For best results plant more than one tree. Hardiness Zone 3. In stock

Pinus torreyana

Pinus torreyana , the Soledad pine, is a very rare pine native to Santa Rosa island and several cliff sites in San Diego county, California. Closely related to Pinus sabiniana and Pinus coulteri. The Soledad pine is a small tree, rarely exceeding 15m. It is not very cold tolerant and will be damaged by temperatures below -6°C. In Ireland, only suitable for mild maritime environments. Nut-producing capability in Ireland uncertain. Hardiness Zone 9b. Available March 2018

 

Hickories and Hecans (NEW)

The hickories and pecans (Carya spp. ) are part of the Juglandaceae or walnut family. They are exclusively native to North America. While it is unlikely the pecan has any potential for nut production in Ireland, the hickory shows some promise. Mature trees can be found growing in some of Ireland's botanical gardens. There are about ten different hickory species, of which the Shagbark hickory (Carya ovata) has shown the greatest potential for nut production. They will do best on dry warm sites.

Hicans (Carya illinoensis x ovata ) are a hybrid between the pican (Carya illinoensis ) and the Shagbark Hickory (Carya Ovata ). They combine the flavour of the pican and hardiness of the hickory. Hicans occur naturally in the wild in the eastern United states where both pecans and hickory occupy the same forests. Many distinct cultivars have been developed by growers, some of which have succeeded as far north as British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec provinces in Canada. Hicans are almost completely unknown in Europe. Although untested in Irish conditions, they have the potential to do well on warm dry sites.

The hickory and hican trees offered are not grown from nut but are propagated vegetively by grafting fruiting scions of known cultivars onto seedling pecan rootstocks.

Unlike trees raised from nut, which are unreliable in terms of nut production and quality, and take many years to reach nut bearing age, grafted trees always come true to form and begin cropping at a young age. In order to facilitate pollination, it is advisable to plant more than one cultivar. Hickories and hicans are mutually pollinating.

Hickories and hicans grow into big trees so should be spaced at 10-12 meters.

Grafted trees supplied at 30-45cm, 45-70cm, 70-100cm and 100-140cm sizes

Cultivars

Shellbark Hickory

Yoder. Produces large nut with excellent flavour. Nuts easily cracked.

Hican

Burton. The most well-known of the hicans. High quality nut with excellent flavour

Wescheke. Sometimes mistakenly listed as a hickory, Wescheke's distinctive pecan-shaped leaves confirm its parentage. It produces a medium sized nut of good flavour

 

Edible Oaks (NEW)

The oaks comprise a large genus of approximately 500 species of trees and shrubs, distributed across the northern hemisphere from tropical latitudes to cold temperate and sub-arctic regions. Throughout human history acorns have probably been eaten by indigenous people, and were highly prized by many hunter-gatherer cultures.

In North America, it is well documented that acorns were used as a staple food by indigenous people. Often, the annual acorn harvest was a major cultural event. In the Mediterranean regions of Europe and the Near East, acorns were also an important food. Dried and roasted, acorns can be used to make flour. The nutrient content of acorns is similar to that of chestnuts. Acorns contain varying amounts of tannin, which in high doses is detrimental to human health. Generally, the acorns most prized were those from the oak species with the lowest tannin content. The tannin content can be significantly reduced by soaking the acorns then draining off the water, repeating the process as many times as necessary.

Within Europe, two evergreen oaks, namely the Holm oak (Quercus ilex) and the Cork oak (Quercus suber), have a low tannin content and an agreeable taste. Both have been used as human food until recent times. In many Mediterranean countries - both European and North African - oak woods are still highly valued and are used for grazing pigs, sheep and cows. In many cases the same carefully-balanced system of woodland management and livestock grazing has been practiced for hundreds of years. The most well-known of these is the Spanish dehesas. In Portugal the evergreen oaklands are called montados, while the Moroccans use the word azaghar.

Indigenous woodlands of the Cork oak can be found throughout the western Mediterranean and also along the Atlantic seaboard of Spain and Portugal. The indigenous Holm oak is found mainly in the Western Mediterranean and Iberia, but its range extends east as far as Greece and northwards to western France. Both oaks have been cultivated much further north. They were introduced to England in the16th century. They are perfectly hardy in coastal regions of Ireland, but the both are vulnerable to severe frosts (especially the Cork oak). For this reason, the Cork oak is unsuitable for colder inland locations.

Winter minimum temperatures

The Cork oak is considered hardy to about minus 8 Celsius. Temperatures below this almost never occur in coastal areas, and would also be very rare in inland locations close to large bodies of water. The Holm oak is hardy to about minus 16 Celsius. Some specimens in Ireland were apparently killed by the unusually low temperatures of December 2010.

Holm Oak (Quercus ilex)                                        
The principal oak used for human food in the Mediterranean area and in Iberia. Evergreen. Very long lived tree, fully hardy in most parts of Ireland. Will produce first acorns at about ten years.
In stock

Cork Oak (Quercus suber )                                        
Highly prized in Portugal and the Western Mediterranean for its thick cork bark, long used in production of bottle stoppers, buoyancy devices, floor tiles, insulation and many other produts. Evergreen. Acorns smaller than Quercus ilex. Hardy in coastal parts of Ireland. Will produce first acorns at about ten years.
In stock

 

Monkey Puzzle Tree (Araucaria araucana) New for 2016/17

The Monkey Puzzle tree (Araucaria araucana) is a coniferous tree sometimes known as the Araucarian or Chilean pine, although it is not actually a pine species. It is the hardiest member of the genus Araucaria, in the Araucariaceae family, the other members of which are found widely scattered in Oceania, northern Australia and parts of South America. The Monkey Puzzle is native to the south-central Andes, the main habitat region being situated at latitudes between 37.5 and 39.5ºS. It is found mainly on the Chilean side, typically above 1000m altitudes. The climate is mild temperate and annual rainfall is 1250-1750mm (occasionally 2000mm).

In their native habitat Monkey Puzzle trees can grow up to 48m high and live for over 1200 years. Mature trees produce large cones, each of which contains up to 200 nuts. The nuts are both tasty and nutritious and have been long prized as a food by indigenous peoples. Generally, trees begin to produce nuts at around 30-40 years. Popular as an ornamental tree, the Monkey Puzzle has been planted in many northern hemisphere countries and is found growing well as far north as 63ºN in western Norway. It will tolerate wet maritime climates, salt exposure, and winter temperatures down to minus 20 Ce

Pollination

The trees are dioecious, meaning the male and female reproductive parts are on different trees. For reliable nut production, at least six trees should be planted.

In stock

 

Main Stock List

Almonds

Baretooted maidens on St Julien A rootstock. Almonds require warm sunny walls in order to do well. They will do best in the drier parts of Ireland.

Ingrid                                          
Swedish variety, known to grow well in the UK.
Reasonable resistance to peach leaf curl. Self fertile. Crops September/October. Available December 2016 to March 2017

 

Buartnuts

The trees offered are not grown from nut but are propagated vegetively by grafting fruiting scions of known cultivars onto seedling rootstocks.

Unlike trees raised from nut, which are unreliable in terms of nut production and quality, and take many years to reach nut bearing age, grafted trees always come true to form and begin cropping at a young age. In order to facilitate pollination, it is advisable to plant more than one cultivar, or plant alongside heartnuts.

Buartnuts grow into big trees so should be spaced at 10-12 meters.

Young grafted trees 30-45cm, 45-70cm, 70-100cm and 100-140cm

Cultivars

Mitchell
Medium size nut, heartnut shaped shell, fairly good cracking. Canadian origin. Partially self-fertile but will also be pollinated by most heartnuts but especially Campbell CW1 and Imshu.
Available November, supply limited, will sellout very early.

Buartnut seedlings

Two year old plants raised at our own nursery from selected seed from Ontario Province, Canada. Unlike the named cultivars of Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis, these seed-grown trees are unlikely to produce reliable crops of nuts. Vigorous and strong, they will grow into fine large specimen trees suitable for timber production. The trees may also be used for rootstock for grafting purposes. Available November

50-80cm €9.50 ea

 

Cobnuts

We use the word 'cobnut' to cover all cultvated varieties of the hazelnut (including filberts). Please note that cobnuts are not self fertile, for success plant two or more different varieties. This will ensure good pollination. Trees available in sizes from 40-240cm.

Young barerooted trees 40-60 cm high. Only suitable for growing on for a further year before planting out in a final position. Minimum quantity 50 trees. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, Kentish Cob, Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific) and Webb's Prize. Available from February 2017

Two year barerooted trees 60-100cm high. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, Kentish Cob, Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific), Rotblatterige Zellernuss and Webb's Prize. Available from November 2016

Three year barerooted trees 100-140 cm high. Already nut bearing. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, and Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific). Available from February 2017

Three year barerooted trees 140-180 cm high. Already nut bearing. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, and Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific). Available from February 2017

Four year barerooted trees 100-140 cm high. Already nut bearing. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, and Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific). Available from November 2016

Four year barerooted trees 140-180 cm high. Already nut bearing. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, and Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific). Available from November 2016

Four year barerooted trees 180-220 cm high. Cultivars available: Cosford, Hall's Giant, and Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific). Available from November 2016

Extra Large barerooted trees 220 cm+ high. Cultivars available: Cosford, Gunslebert and Hall's Giant. Available from November 2016. Trees too big to be shipped, collection only

Cultivars

Butler                                              
North American variety. Potentially heavy cropper but may require good conditions to crop well. Large nuts. Vigorous growth.

Corabel                                               
French variety. Heavy cropper but may require good conditions to crop well. Good pollinator.Very tasty nuts.

Cosford                                              
Traditional variety. Very good pollinator for other species. Vigorous growth. Yield relatively low compared to other varieties but reliable performance in a wide variety of conditions.

Dutch EMOA 1
Recent Dutch cultivar performing well in trials in UK and the Netherlands. Good yields of large nuts.

Fertile de Coutard (syn. Barcelona)
Vigorous tree with female flowers appearing at a very young age. Has produced nuts on three year old trees at our site in Westport. Although grown mainly in France and Spain, appears adaptable to Irish conditions.
Vulnerable to heavy frosts.

Gunslebert                                          
German variety. Heavy and reliable cropper. Good flavour.

Hall's Giant
Hardy, very vigorous and productive variety with large nuts. Good flavour. Best performer in trials by the Agroforestry Research Trust in Devon.
Probably the most vigorous of all the cobnuts listed here.

Kentish Cob
Traditionally grown in Kent but thought to be from France originally. Compact, hardy variety with exceptionally tasty nuts. Not a massive cropper and relatively slow to devevlop.

Lange Tidling Zeller
German cultivar. Heavy yields of small to medium sized nuts. Long attractive catkins.

Longue de Espagne
Compact tree suitable to smaller gardens. Early ripening.

Nottingham (Pearson's Prolific)
Early ripening and profilic cropper, with tasty nuts. Relatively vigorous grower in early years. Did well in Devon trials.
Known to perform well in Ireland.

Rotblatterige Zellernuss
Vigorous and very attractive tree. Large nuts with very good flavour. Leaves and husks are bronze red.

Webb's Prize Cob
Large sweet nut, prolific cropper. Compact tree, good for small gardens. Quite slow in early years. Did well in Devon trials.

 

Chestnuts

Four different sizes of barerooted trees are available: 40-70cm, 70-100cm,100-140cm and 140-180cm. The larger trees will generally begin cropping earlier.

The trees are propagated by stooling or grafting,and unlike seed-grown trees will always come true to variety. Seed-grown trees are generally unreliable for nut production (see further information below).

Cultivars

Belle Epine                                           
Mid season to late variety, adaptable to wide variety of climates and soils. Widely grown in western France.  Fruiting from 5th or 6th year. Partially self fertile but also pollinated by Bournette, Maron Goujounac and Marigoule. Very good pollinator for other varieties.
Not available 2016/17

Bouche de Bétizac                                           
Early to mid season variety, adaptable to wide variety of climate and soils. Highly resistant to disease. Widely grown in western France and Brittany. Fruiting from 5th or 6th year. Self sterile. Pollinated by Belle Epine, Bournette,Maron Goujounac and Marigoule. Not available 2016/17                                                             

Bournette                                              
Early to mid season variety. Widely grown in W. France and Brittany. Fruiting from 3rd or 4th year. Grafted onto disease resistant rootstock. Partially self fertile but also pollinated by Belle Epine, Maron Goujounac and Marigoule.
Not available 2016/17

Marigoule                                           
Early to mid season variety, adaptable to wide variety of climate and soils. Very vigorous and highly resistant to disease. Widely grown in western France and Brittany.  Fruiting from 5th or 6th year. Partially self fertile but also pollinated by Belle Epine, Maron Goujounac and Bournette.
Available November

Marlhac                                         
Early to mid season variety. Widely grown in W France. Performed well in trials in Devon. Fruiting from 5th or 6th year. Self sterile. Pollinated by Belle Epine, Marigoule, Maron Goujounac and Bournette.
Available November

Maron Goujounac                                          
Early to mid season variety. Indigenous to W France. Cropping only fair but extremely good pollinator. Pollinated by Belle Epine, Marigoule, and Bournette.
Not available 2016/17

Marsol                                         
Mid season variety. Widely grown in W France. Vigorous and disease resistant. Good cropper with high quality nuts. Fair pollinator. Pollinated by Belle Epine, Marigoule, Maron Goujounac and Bournette.
Available November

There is a very high demand for named varieties of chestnut. Supply from outside Ireland is restricted owing to (very justifiable) concerns about the spread of chestnut blight. It is advisable to order as early as possible.

Sweet Chestnut Seedlings

Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut

The seedlings have been raised at our own nursery from seed originating in England. Unlike the named cultivars of Castanea sativa, these seed-grown trees are very unlikely to produce good crops of nuts. However they will grow into fine large specimen trees suitable for fuel, stakes or posts or timber production. They may also be used for grafting purposes. Supplied as 3yr trees 100-140cm. Available November 2016. Further details here

Castanea crenata x sativa - Sweet Chestnut hybrids

These have been raised at our own nursery from seed originating in England. They are the seed of trees regarded as stable hybrids between the European and Japanese chestnut. Like the seed grown trees of Castanea sativa, listed above, these trees are unlikely to produce crops of nuts comparable to trees propagated from named varieties by vegetative means.Neverthless. the seed will carry some good nut bearing characteristics.

Most Castanea crenata x sativa hybrids are more vigorous and more disease resistant than C.sativa, and are generally a better choice than C.sativa for use as rootstocks for named cultivars. Supplied as 3yr trees 100-140cm. Available November 2016. Further details here

 

Heartnuts

The trees offered are not grown from nut but are propagated vegetively by grafting fruiting scions of known cultivars onto seedling rootstocks. The cultivars all originate in Canada or the northern parts of United States.

Unlike trees raised from nut, which are unreliable in terms of nut production and quality, and take many years to reach nut bearing age, grafted trees always come true to form and begin cropping at a young age. The trees are generally not self-fertile so more than one cultivar should be planted.

Heartnuts grow into big trees so should be spaced at 10-12 meters.

Young grafted trees 30-45cm, 45-70cm, 70-100cm,100-140cm and 140-180cm

Cultivars

Campbell CW1
Canadian variety. Medium to large nut, top performer, nuts tend to come out in halves. Vigorous grower with some resistance to late frosts.
Available November

Campbell CW3
Canadian variety. Medium sized nut, heavy producer, later cropping than CW1.
Available November

Campbell CW4
Canadian variety. Medium sized nut, moderate producer, later cropping than CW1.
More compact in growth. Available November

Grimo Manchurian
Canadian variety. Medium sized nut, compact tree, possibly more suitable for smaller gardens. Very winter hardy but susceptible to late spring frosts.
Available November

Imshu
Bred from Schubert and unnamed Korean seedling . Small to medium nut, moderate to heavy producer, usually cracks out whole. Some resistance to late frosts.
Available November

Kalmar
Swedish variety developed from mature tree found growing in Eastern Sweden. Vigorous tree. Winter hardy but a little susceptible to late spring frosts.
Available November

Schubert
US variety. Parent of Imshu. Medium sized nut, moderate producer. Vigorous tree, good resistance to late frosts.
Available November

Simcoe
Large nut, good cracker, productive.
Not available 2016/17

Stealth
Medium sized nut, easy cracker.
Not available 2016/17

Supply of heartnuts is limited. All varieties listed as being available 2016/17 will sell out

 

Heartnut seedlings

Two year old plants raised at our own nursery from selected seed from Ontario Province, Canada. Unlike the named cultivars of Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis, these seed-grown trees are unlikely to produce reliable crops of nuts. Vigorous and strong, they will grow into fine large specimen trees suitable for timber production. The trees may also be used for rootstock for grafting purposes.

50-80cm €9.50 ea. Available November

 

Walnuts

The trees offered are not grown from nut but are propagated vegetively by grafting fruiting scions of known cultivars onto seedling rootstocks.

Unlike trees raised from nut, which are unreliable in terms of nut production and quality, grafted trees always come true to form. In order to facilitate pollination, it is advisable to plant more than one cultivar.

Walnuts grow into big trees so should be spaced at 10-12 meters.

Barerooted trees on J.Regia rootstock:

Five different sizes of barerooted trees are available: 44-70cm, 70-100cm,100-140cm, 140-180cm and 180cm+. The larger trees are older and will generally begin cropping earlier. However, planting small can allow better root development.

Cultivars

Amphyon
Dutch variety from Groningen province. Vigorous, grows into large spreading tree. Can be prone to walnut blight in ealry years, probably not a good choice for the high rainfall areas. Nuts shed husk easily. Excellent flavour. Self fertile (pollination group 1/2).

Broadview
Canadian variety popular in the UK. Produces medium to large nut, late season. In high rainfall areas susceptible to walnut blight. In Ireland, does best in eastern regions that are not prone to late spring frosts. Pollination group 1-2.

Chiara
New Dutch variety from DeSmallekamp.. The nuts are large, very tasty and store for a long time. Produces good crops even in difficult years but flowers early and is a little vulnerable to late frosts. Self pollinating, pollination group 1.

Coenen
Dutch variety from Noord-Brabant. Strong tree with a broad, loose and open crown. Early budding so can be vulnerable to late frosts. Excellent flavour. Good pollinator and partially self fertile but does better with pollinator (pollination group 1).

Corne du Perigord
Traditional French variety with very good disease resistance. Medium sized nut ready mid season. Strong grower. Has done exceptionally well in trials in Devon. Good pollinator for other varieties. Pollination group 1/2. Highly recommended.

Cyril
Dutch variety  from Groningen. The tree is strong and reasonably strait in growth. The crown is quite dense. One of the latest flowering of the Dutch varieties so good for frosty areas. Large, well filled nuts. Partially self fertile (pollination group 1/2). Recommended.

Dionym
Dutch variety from Groningen. Produces medium sized tree. Precocious - will produce nuts within 3-4 years.  Disease resistant.  Good quality nuts. Good pollinator and self fertile (pollination group 1/2).

Excelsior of Taynton
Rare English variety from Gloucestershire.
Pollination group 1/2. Not available 2015/16

Fernette
Raised in France 1978. Lateral-bearing variety very quick to come into fruit. Leafing characteristics similar to Fernor. Often used as a pollinator for Fernor. Pollination group 1/2.

Fernor
Raised in France 1978. Lateral-bearing variety very quick to come into production. Late leafing, and high productivity. Nuts relatively late (Mid October onwards). One of the best performing varieties in France at the present time. Pollination group 2.

Fertignac
New French variety (2005), showing good potential. Lateral-bearing variety very quick to come into production. Trees at our nursery have produced nuts at 3 years. Late leafing, and high productivity. Nuts relatively late (Mid October onwards). Pollination group 1/2. Highly recommended

Franquette
Traditional French variety with moderate disease resistance. Good cropper. Medium sized nut ready late season. Partially self fertile (pollination group 2).

Mars
Strong and disease-resistant variety from Czech Republic. Tasty large nuts.  The tree is self pollinating and due to its late flowering is not susceptible to light frost (pollination group 2).

Mayette
Traditional French variety with good disease resistance. Medium sized nut ready late season. Late to leaf out Recommended. Partially self fertile (pollination group 2). Highly recommended.

Meylanaise
Traditional French variety with very good disease resistance. Good cropper. Medium sized nut ready late season. Good pollinator. Partially self fertile (pollination group 1/2). Highly recommended.

Minimultiflora nr. 14
Dwarfing variety raised by DeSmallekamp, producing compact tree with smaller nuts. Cropping potential in Ireland uncertain.
Somewhat susceptible to damage from late frosts. Possibly self fertile (pollination group 1).

No.16
A seedling from Rita, raised in Michegan. Medium to large trees. Large and tasty nuts with very good storage (up to one year). Very early to leaf and flower so unsuitable for areas prone to late frosts. Self pollinating (pollination group 1). Unavailable 2015/16

Parisienne
Traditional French variety with good disease resistance. Very vigorous grower. Medium to large nuts nut ready late season. Late to late out and flower so good for areas with late frosts. Pollination group 2.

Plovdivski
Vigorous Bulgarian variety with good disease resistance. Large nuts but unreliable cropper in maritime climates. Pollination group 2.
Discontinued

Rita
Bred from Carpathian stock. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1.
The first of our trialled varieties to produce nuts in Westport. Very early to leaf and flower so vulnerable to spring frosts.

Ronde de Montignac
Old French variety with good disease resistance. Smallish nut ready early in the season. Very good flavour. Cropped well in trials in Devon. Good pollinator (pollination group 1/2). Highly recommended.

Rote Danaunuss
Red nut from Austria. Very attractive tree with bronze foliage but cropping potential in Ireland uncertain. Early leafing so quite vulnerable to late frosts. Pollination group 1.

 

Unless stated, all varieties listed are available November

 

Seed-grown walnut

Two year old Juglans regia (common European or Persian walnut) from selected seed from Central Europe. Unlike the named cultivars of Juglans regia, these seed-grown trees are unlikely to produce reliable crops of nuts but will grow into fine specimen trees suitable for timber production. The trees may also be used for rootstock for grafting purposes. Minimum quantity 10 trees.

80-100 cm 10-49 trees €2.80 ea , 50-199 trees €2.20 ea 200+ trees €2 ea

Available November

 

Ginkgo

The ginkgo tree, Ginkgo biloba, is the sole member of the ginkgo genus, and the only surviving member of the ancient ginkgoaceae family, whose ancestor’s fossilised remains have been found in many parts of the world (including Europe). The oldest remains date back around 200 million years to the early Jurassic period. The tree was generally thought to be extinct but in the seventeenth century a large tree was discovered in a botanical garden in Japan. Ginkgo trees were later found growing wild in several localities of the Zhejiang province in eastern China, where the tree had long been cultivated by Buddhist monks.

The trees are dioecious, meaning the male and female reproductive parts are on different trees. Male trees are often grown for their ornamental value. The ginkgo nut, which forms on the female trees, is surrounded by a fleshy outer layer (which has been variously described as smelling like rancid butter or decomposing flesh). However, in localities where the ginkgo tree grows, the nut is highly prized.

Ginkgo grows into a big tree, reaching 30 metres or more in its native habitat. It is shade intolerant and requires an open sunny position

Young grafted trees (50-80cm high)

Female varieties

Eastern Star A new cultivar from China, noted for its productivity and ability to begin cropping at a young age

Geisha A recent cultivar from Japan. Produces heavy crops of large, richly-flavoured nuts. Spreading, drooping habit

Long March Upright growing variety recently developed in China. Highly productive with large, tasty nuts.

Male varieties

Saratoga Good pollinator for the female varieties listed above and also valuable makes an attractive ornamental tree. Vivid yellow foliage in the autumn.

grafted trees not available 2016/17

 

Seed-grown trees

Seed-grown trees, random mix of male and females. Very ornamental. Available November

 

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