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Fruit Trees from Fruit and Nut
   
Fruit Price List 2017
  Unit price (euro)
1 tree 2 trees 3-9 trees 10-49 trees 50-199 trees 200+ trees
Barerooted trees/bushes (supplied November 2017-April 2018)
Apricot maidens St Julien A rootstock
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
20.00
P.O.A.
Apricot 2yr St Julien A rootstock
40.00
36.00
33.00
29.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Apple maidens (all rootstocks)
20.00
18.00
16.50
14.90
12.90
12.00
Apple 2 yr Cordon/Bush trained, M9/M26/MM106
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
15.70
14.60
Apple 3 yr Bush trained, M9/M26/MM106
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
15.70
Apple 2 yr Straight leads M25 (Cider varieties only)
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
15.70
Cherry maidens (F.12.1, Colt, Krymsk 5 and Gisela 5 rootstocks)
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
15.70
14.60
Cherry 2 yr (F.12.1, Colt, Krymsk 5 and Gisela 5 rootstocks)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Cherry 3 yr (F.12.1, Colt, Krymsk 5 and Gisela 5 rootstocks)
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Damson/Bullace maidens (St Julien A/ Pixy rootstocks)
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
15.70
14.60
Damson/Bullace 2 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Damson/Bullace 3 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Medlar maidens Quince A rootstocks)
20.00
18.00
16.50
14.90
12.90
12.00
Medlar 2yr Quince A rootstocks)
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Mirabelle maidens (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
15.70
P.O.A.
Mirabelle 2 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Mirabelle 3 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Nectarine maidens (St Julien A rootstock)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Nectarine 2 yr (St Julien A rootstock)
36.00
32.00
29.00
26.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Peach maidens (St Julien A rootstock)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Peach 2 yr (St Julien A rootstock)
36.00
32.00
29.00
26.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Pear maidens (Quince A and C, and Pyrus rootstocks)
22.00
20.00
18.30
16.50
14.50
12.90
Pear 2yr (Quince A and C, and Pyrus rootstocks)
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
15.70
Pear 3yr (Quince A and C, and Pyrus rootstocks)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Plum/Gage maidens (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
22.00
20.00
18.30
16.50
14.50
12.50
Plum/Gage 2 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
26.00
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.50
15.20
Plum/Gage 3 yr (St Julien A and Pixy rootstocks)
32.00
29.00
26.50
24.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Quince maidens (Quince A and Quince C rootstocks)
24.00
22.00
20.00
18.00
15.70
14.60
Quince 2 yr (Quince A and Quince C rootstocks)
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Aronia 2yr 60-100cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
4.20
3.60
P.O.A.
Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) 100-140cm
24.00
22.00
20.00
17.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Cornus kousa chinensis 100-140cm
16.00
15.00
14.50
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Crab apples named varieties, maidens
20.00
18.00
16.50
14.90
12.90
12.00
Eleagnus (Eleagnus umbellata) 1 yr 30-50cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
2.54
1.95
1.50
Eleagnus (Eleagnus umbellata) 2yr 50-80cm
6.00
5.00
5.00
4.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Sea Buckthorn, named varieties 1yr 50-80cm
n/a
n/a
n/a
4.00
3.45
3.00
Sea Buckthorn, named varieties 2yr 80-120cm
8.00
7.00
6.50
5.90
5.40
4.80

All the above items can be shipped by post or courier

* For wholesale prices (50 or more trees), the minimum number of any one variety is normally 10 trees

Container-grown trees/bushes (supplied all year round subject to availability)
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 1 yr P9*
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.00
2.60
2.20
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 2 yr, 3l
8.00
7.00
6.50
5.90
5.40
4.80
Aronia, named varieties, (Aronia prunifolia) 3 yr, 5l
12.50
11.20
10.00
8.90
8.20
P.O.A.
Blueberry, named varieties, P9 container *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
3.00
2.55
Blueberry, named varieties, 2l container
8.00
7.00
5.90
4.80
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Mulberry, named varieties, 7l container 100-140cm *
29.00
27.00
24.70
22.60
18.70
P.O.A.
Mulberry, named varieties, 12l container 120-160cm*
40.00
36.00
32.50
29.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Rubus Betty Ashburner, P9 container *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
1.92
1.60
Rubus Betty Ashburner, 3l container *
n/a
4.00
3.60
3.00
P.O.A.
P.O.A.
Rubus pentalabus, 1.3l container *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2.50
2.00
Sea Buckthorn, named varieties P9 container *
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
4.30
3.60
Sea Buckthorn, named varieties 3l container *
10.00
9.00
7.90
7.20
6.50
5.90
* all the items marked with an asterix can be shipped, but will usually be removed from their containers and sent barerooted (barerooted season only). The other items are for collection only.

What if you can't decide which fruit trees you want?

Tree selection made simple

 

Tables showing pollination groups, harvest time, storage potential, usage and disease resistance of all the apple, cherry, damson, pear and plum varieties in our stocklists

Pollination, Fruit Use and Disease Resistance

Latest Information on New Varieties Offered 2014/15

Stock information

Fruit trees and fruit bushes are listed separately, in alphabetical order. The first listings are the new items for 2015/16

 

New for 2016/17

Peach

Gorgeous                             
Medium sized purple-red fruit with yellow flesh, sweet and juicy, very good flavour. Late flowering, so less susceptible to frost. September. Self fertile. Kent

Apricot

Aprimira                        
Hybrid between mirabelle and apricot. Small yellow-pink fruit with distinctive apricot flavour. Makes a very compact tree, possibly suited for container growing. Rather special but requires warm sunny sites, best grown against a wall. Has cropped successfully outside at our trial site near Westport (2016). Slightly hardier than the Flavor King (below). Partially self fertile but also pollinated by early plums (pollination group 1).

Flavor King                      
Hybrid between plum and apricot. Purple fruit with apricot scent and rich sweet flavour. Makes a very compact tree, possibly suited for container growing. Like the aprimira, rather special but requires warm sunny sites, best grown against a wall. Partially self fertile but also pollinated by early plums (pollination group 1).

Helena de Rousillon                                               
Medium-sized orange-red fruit. Sweet with excellent flavour. Mid August. Late flowering so less susceptible to spring frosts.
Good disease resistance. France 1989

Cherry

Meteor Korai                          
Duke cherry (dual purpose eating and cooking cherry). Duke cherry. Naturally compact but very reliable and productive. Good split and disease resistance. Cropping late June to early July. Originally from Hungary c1970 but developed in the Czech Republic.
Self fertile and good early pollinator.

Mirabelle

Countess                           
Dark red with yellow-red flesh. Juicy and very sweet. Excellent eating quality. August. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2

Apples - Eaters and Cookers

Christmas Pippin. Eater. Very high quality. Crisp, juicy and sweet with honey flavour. Crops well and very reliable. October, will store well till Christmas. Pollination group 3. Somerset 2011. The original tree was found growing wild by the M5 motorway. Recommended. Available on M9 and MM106.

Honey Crisp. Eater. One of only two North American apple varieties in our lists. Large exceptionally jucy fruit, sweet but mild in flavour (some apple connoisseurs might find it a little bland). It grows very well in Nova Scotia, Canada, out-cropping most other varieties. Also noted for it's very good storage qualities. October, will store till March or April. Pollination group 3. Minnesota 1988. Available as maiden tree on MM106.

Red Windsor. Red sport of Alkmene, parents Cox's Orange Pippin and Duchess of Oldenburg. Exceptional flavour, slightly more acid than Cox. Also highly disease resistant. . September. Pollination group 2 but regarded as self fertile. Herefordshire 1985 (Alkmene was developed in Germany in 1930). Available as 2 yr bush on M9.

Rosette. Very new apple, developed by the Frank Matthews nursery in Worcestershire 2011. Best known for its reddish pink flesh with the distrinctive rosette pattern. Juicy, sweet, good flavour. Good disease resistance. Very early fruiting, around mid-August. Pollination group 2. Available as 2 yr bush on M26 rootstock (not strong growing so will develop more like an M9) and also as a maiden tree on MM106

Tickled Pink (Baya Marisa). New variety, red skinned but more known for its unique red flesh. Generally considered a cooker (the colour keeps when cooked), great in pies. Quite disease resistant and will store to the New Year. Also used for juice (red!) and can be used as an eater when fully ripe (slightly tart). Pollination group 3. Bavaria 2005. Available as 2 yr bush on M9 and also as a maiden tree on MM106

Yellow Ingestrie. Old variety, Orange Pippin x Golden Pippin. Firm and crisp, aromatic, exquisite flavour. September-October. Pollination group 2. Originates c 1800. Mentioned in Hogg. Available as maidens on MM106.

Apples - Cider

Major. Full bittersweet. Vintage quality. Astringent. Very vigorous, good cropper but can be biennial. September to October. Pollination group 5. Somerset 19th century.

Médaille D'Or. Full bittersweet. Sweet, fruity, very astringent. Vintage quality. One for the connoisseur. Compact tree, good cropper but branches prone to breakage. Pollination group 6 (very late). Normandy 1865.

Plums and Gages

Belle de Louvain. Dual purpose plum. Produces large crops of purple fruit. Flesh yellow turning red when cooked. August. Self fertile (pollination group 3). Belgium c1845 .

Guinevere. Large purple/black fruit. Heavy cropper. One of the tastiest late plums. Late September/early October. Self fertile (pollination group 3). Kent 2000.

Haganta. Large dark blue fruit with golden flesh. Freestone. Lovely scent and excellent flavour. September. Self fertile (pollination group 3). Germany 2005.

 

Damsons

Aylesbury  Prune                                            
Sweet damson of plum eating quality. Suitable for eating fresh or cooking. Developed in Buckinghamshire England c1997. Late August to early September. Self fertile.

Fruit trees - Full List

Apples - general information

Apples are generally not self fertile so will require a pollinator from the same or adjacent pollination group. For example:a cultivar (variety) in pollination group 3 will require a pollinator from groups 2, 3 or 4. Triploids require a pollinator from the same or adjacent pollination group but will not provide reciprocal pollination. Hence the pollinator of a triploid requires its own separate pollinator.

Months listed refer to the eating period if the apple is stored in cool conditions. Some apples will keep considerably longer in optimum storage conditions.

Rootstocks

Cultivars  listed below are available on a range of different rootstocks: M27 rootstock is ultra dwarfing, will produce very small trees; M9 is dwarfing and is the modern standard for high density orchards or small gardens. M26 is somewhat more vigorous, MM106 more vigorous still, used in larger gardens and the more traditional orchards especially cider ones. M116 is a new rootstock that is between M26 and MM106, but with better disease resistance. M25 and M111 are very vigorous, will produce really big trees. M25 is sometimes used for cider. M111 is more resistant to wet soils.

Generally speaking, the more vigorous the rootstock, the greater adaptability to poor soils. More information can be found on our rootstock information page.

Rootstock information

Please refer to the table in the catalogue for a summary of which varieties are available on which rootstocks.

Catalogue/Order Form

 

Advance ordering of apples for 2015/16

We offer significant discounts on wholesale prices for trees required for the 2015/16 season.

Advance Tree Prices (Apples) 2015/16
  Unit Price (euro)
1 tree 2-9 trees 10-49 trees 50-199 trees 200+ trees
Barerooted trees (supplied November 2015- April 2016)
Maidens (eaters, cookers and cider, MM106 and M25) n/a n/a
13.70
11.28
10.00
2yr Bush (eater and cookers, M9 and MM106 only) n/a n/a
16.40
14.20
12.56
Straight Leads (cider varieties, M25 only) n/a n/a
18.40
15.74
13.83
These specially reduced rates apply only to trees ordered by 30th June 2015. Minimum number of trees per variety = 5. A deposit of 50 percent is required to secure the order.

 

Apples - Eating and Cooking Varieties

Allington Pippin
Eater. Sharp, crisp, aromatic. October to December. Resistant to scab. Can also be used for juicing and cider. Needs warm location. Unusual for apples, is partially self fertile. Pollination group 3. Lincolnshire c1880
.

Ardcairn Russet
Irish eater. Dry and sweet with slight banana flavour. September. Resistant to scab. Pollination group 3. Cork c1890
.

Bardsey                                                          
Dual purpose apple discovered growing wild on Ynys Enlii (Bardsey Island). Tasty eater when fully ripe. Growing at the Sustainability Institute premises since 2005. September to October. Pollination group 2.

Beauty of Bath                                         
Small fruited sweet early eater. Very resistant to scab and partially resistant to canker. Better choice as an early eater than Irish Peach for high rainfall areas. August. Pollination group 2. Somerset c1860.

Ben's Red                                         
Eater. Sweet, crisp, with hint of strawberries and raspberries. Very resistant to scab. Produces small, spreading tree, but heavy cropping. September. Pollination group 1/2. Cornwall c1830.

Bramley's Seedling                                        
Justifiably famous cooker producing large crops of large well flavoured fruit. Hardy and vigorous. Moderately high in vitamin C (16mg/100g). Good for juice or cider production. October to March. Pollination group 3 but triplod. Nottingham 1809

Brownlee's Russet                                         
Tasty eater with ornamental blossom. Aromatic, nutty flavour. Resistant to scab and canker. October to March (excellent storage). Pollination group 2. Herefordshire 1848

Charles Ross                                        
Dual purpose apple: sweet for easting but good for baking, cider making and juicing. Hardy and very resistant to scab. September. Pollination group 2/3. Berkshire 1890

Christmas Pippin                                        
Eater. Very high quality. Crisp, juicy and sweet with honey flavour. Crops well and very reliable. October, will store well till Christmas. Pollination group 3. Somerset 2011. The original tree was found growing wild by the M5 motorway. Recommended. Available on M9 and MM106

Cornish Aromatic                                        
Old favourite with very good resistance to canker and scab. One of the most suitable varieties for high rainfall areas. October to February. Pollination group 3. Cornwall 1813

Coul Blush                                        
Cooker/Eater. Hardy and disease resistant variety from Northern Scotland. Yellow streaked with red. Juicy and crisp. September. Pollination group 2. Rosshire 1827

Court of Wick                                            
Small juicy eater. Good flavour. Resistant to scab and canker. Good for juice production. October to December. Pollination group 3

Court Pendu Plat                                           
Very old eating apple  from France dating back to medieval times. Small, tasty, slightly pineapple flavoured fruit. Resistant to scab. November to January but will sometimes keep to May in good storage conditions. Pollination group 5. Performs well in poor growing conditions

Crawley Beauty                                          
Cooker. Resistant to scab and canker. November to February. Becomes sweet late season. Pollination group 5. Sussex 1850

D'Arcy Spice                                           
Spicy eater with hint of nutneg. Also good for juice production. Resistant to scab and canker Very long keeper. November to May. Pollination group 3. Performs well in coastal locations. Essex 1785

Discovery                                           
Eater. August. Possibly the tastiest of the early apples. Crisp with slight hint of strawberry. Bright red with pink coloured flesh. Does not keep. Homegrown ones are much tastier than the ones found in the shops. Pollination group 2/3. Essex 1949

Downton Pippin                                           
Eater. Sometimes used for cider. Small and juicy with intense flavour. September to October. Pollination group 2. Shropshire c1800.

Edward VII                                                   
Cooker (Golden Noble x Blenhein Orange). Makes good puree. Upright tree. Resistant to scab. November to March. Pollination group 5. Worcester 1906. Said to be suitable for forest gardens as survives with minimal pruning

Egremont Russet                                                    
Tasty eater. Resistant to scab and canker hence suitable for high rainfall areas. October to December. Pollination group 2. Sussex 19th Century

Fiesta                                                   
Popular eater, Cox's parentage. Aromatic sweet and crisp. Tree often has weeping form, ornamental. September or October, keeps till January. Pollination group 3. Kent 1972.

Gennet Moyle                                       
Cooker. Also used for cider (bittersweet). Resistant to scab. Very strong grower. September to October. Pollination group 2. Triploid. Herefordshire 18th Century

Gladstone                                       
Very early eater once wider planted in Ireland. Large fruit sometimes prone to cracking. Scab and canker resistant. Raspberry flavour. August but sometimes ripens by late July. Pollination group 3. Worcester 1860

Golden Pippin                                       
Eater. Miniature russet with good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for cooking especially pies and for cider making. October to March. Pollination group 2. Origin unknown

Greensleeves                                                       
Eater. Resistant to scab and canker. Crisp and juicy. October to December. Good pollinator for other varieties. Pollination group 3. Kent 1966.

Grenadier                                                       
Reliable early cooker (James Grieve x Golden Delicious). Not a good keeper so needs to be used soon after picking. Very resistant to scab and canker so suitable for high rainfall areas. August/September. Good pollinator for other varieties. Pollination group 3. Buckinghamshire 1875

Herefordshire Russet                                                        
Eater. Recent introduction, popular with organic growers. Aromatic, very good quality fruit, flavour similar to Cox. Reliable cropper, long keeper. Mid-October to March. Pollination group 3. Kent 2002.

Honey Crisp                              
Eater. The only North American apple variety on our lists. Large exceptionally jucy fruit,
sweet but mild in flavour (some apple connoisseurs might find it a little bland). It grows very well in Nova Scotia, Canada, out-cropping most other varieties. Also noted for it's very good storage qualities. October, will store till March or April. Pollination group 3. Minnesota 1988.

Katja (syn Katy)                                            
Tasty eater (James Grieve x  Worcester Pearmain). Very reliable cropper.  Also good for juicing and cider. Resistant to canker. September/October. Pollination group 3. Sweden 1947

Keswick Codlin                                        
Dual purpose. Very profuse in flower and good cropper. August to September.Very resistant to scab. Pollination group 1. Early flowering so may not be suitable for frost-prone areas. Cumbria 19th Century

Lane's Prince Albert                                       
Late cooker with striped appearance. Good in pies. Resistant to scab and canker so suitable for high rainfall areas. November to February. Pollination group 4 (but long flowering period so good pollinator for other varieties). Hertfordshire 1850

Laxton's Superb                                             
Sweet  juicy, aromatic eater (Wyken Pippen x Cox's Orange Pippin). Sometimes biennial. Susceptible to scab. November to January. Pollination group 4. Bedford 1897

Lemon Pippin                                       
Dual purpose. Juicy eater when fully ripe, with a hint of lemon flavour. Also good for tarts. Reputedly good for drying as does not discolour when cut. Resistant to scab. October to March. Pollination group 4. Normandy early 19th Century

Little Pax                               
Eater. Developed from a tree gifted to Sy Cecilia's abbey on the Isle of Wight. Lovely aromatic, crunchy fruit, red flecked with yellow. Also noted for its large beautiful pale pink flowers, popular with bees. October, will keep till March.
Pollination group 3.

Newton Wonder                                       
Cooker. Large juicy apple good for puree. Resistant to scab and canker. September to December. Pollination group 3/4. Derby 1870

Orleans Reinette                                       
Eater. Dry, sweet and aromatic. Good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for cooking (keeps shape when cooked). October. Pollination group 4. France 18th Century

Oslin                                       
Eater. Very old variety from Scotland, probably of French parentage.  Small fruit, aromatic, crisp and juicy, exceptional flavour tinged with aniseed. Somewhat prone to cracking so does not keep. August/September. Pollination group 2

Pitmaston Pineapple                                       
Conical fruit with rich pineapple flavour. Eater. Can be biennial. Resistant to scab. September to December. Pollination group 3.  Hereford 1785

Pixie                                      
Eater.Small attractive fruit, yellow flushed orange or red. Sweet, aromatic. Resistant to scab. October till March. Pollination group 4. Wisley 1947

Rajka                                      
Cooker but makes good eater when fully ripe. Small fruit but heavy cropper. Resistant to scab. Best in warm location. October. Pollination group 3. Czech republic

Red Devil                                       
Eater. Juicy, crisp, hint of strawberry. Very good flavour. Resistant to scab. October till December. Pollination group 2. Kent 1975

Red Falstaff                                       
Eater.
Red sport of Falstaff (Golden Delicious x James Grieve).Crisp, juicy, rich flavour. October till December. Pollination group 3 but regarded as self fertile. Frost-resistant blossom. Good for juice and also for cider (medium sharp). Norfolk 1983 .

Red Pixie                                      
Eater. Red version of Pixie. Very attractive fruit, popular with children. Sweet, aromatic. Resistant to scab. October till March. Pollination group 4. 

Redsleeves                                       
Eater. Crisp juicy and sweet, slightly aromatic. Resistant to scab. Good cropper. September. Pollination group 3. Kent 1986

Red Windsor                                     
Eater.
Red sport of Alkmene, parents Cox's Orange Pippin and Duchess of Oldenburg. Exceptional flavour, slightly more acid than Cox. Also highly disease resistant. . September. Pollination group 2 but regarded as self fertile. Herefordshire 1985 (Alkmene was developed in Germany in 1930).

Rev W. Wilks                                       
Early cooker. Resistant to scab and canker. Recommended for high rainfall areas. When fully ripe can be used as an eater. August to October. Pollination group 2. Berkshire 1908

Ribston Pippin                                       
Eater. October to January. Juicy, firm, aromatic. Rich flavour. Very high in vitamin C (31mg/100g). Also good for cooking, juicing and cider. Can be susceptible to canker. Pollination group 2. Triploid. Originally raised in Yorkshire from pip imported from France c1707. Parent of Cox's Orange Pippin.

Rosemary Russet                                       
Eater. Aromatic with excellent flavour. Also used for juice production. Good resistance to scab and canker. October. Pollination group 3. Middlesex 1830

Rosette                                       
Very new apple, developed by the Frank Matthews nursery in Worcestershire 2011. Best known for its reddish pink flesh with the distrinctive rosette pattern. Juicy, sweet, good flavour. Also fairly disease resistant. Very early fruiting, around mid-August. Pollination group 2.

Ross non Pareil                                       
Eater. Intense flavoured russet grown in Ireland from a pip of French origin. Resistant to scab and canker. October to December. Pollination group 2. Rosslare, 18th Century.

St Edmund's Russet                                       
Eater. Sweet, juicy, very tasty with touch of pear flavour. Good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for juice and cider. September. Pollination group 2. Suffolk 1875

Sunset                                                            
Eater similar to Cox's Orange Pippin but hardier. Resistant to scab but can be susceptible to canker. October to December. Pollination group 3. Kent 1918.

Tickled Pink (Baya Marisa)                                                         
New variety, red skinned but more known for its unique red flesh. Generally considered a cooker (the colour keeps when cooked), great in pies. Quite disease resistant and will store to the New Year. Also used for juice (red!) and can be used as an eater when fully ripe (slightly tart). Pollination group 3. Bavaria 2005.

Tom Putt                                        
Cooker. Vigorous. Also used for juice and cider (sharp). Very resistant to scab. September. Pollination group 3. Devon 18th Century

Yellow Ingestrie. Old variety, Orange Pippin x Golden Pippin. Firm and crisp, aromatic, exquisite flavour. September-October. Pollination group 2. Originates c 1800. Mentioned in Hogg.

Most varieties available November but please check before ordering

 

Special offer for community orchard or school projects

Community orchard collection of 8 apple trees, two years old with fruiting spurs, mixed varieties (M9 rootstock only) €150 delivery free to any address in Republic of Ireland.

Apples - Cider Varieties

Black Dabinette                                           
Full bittersweet, astringent. Probably a sport or seedling of Dabinett. Vintage quality. Fruit dark purple-brown. Resistant to scab. November to January. Pollination group 5. Later and more astringent than Dabinett. Somerset

Brown's                                      
Bittersharp category. Dark red fruit. Very resistant to scab. September to October. Pollination group 4. South Devon c1900

Dabinette                                           
Full bittersweet, astringent. Vintage quality. Resistant to scab. October to January. Pollination group 5. Regarded as one of the most reliable cider varieties. Somerset

Gennet Moyle                                       
Bittersweet. Also used for cooking. Resistant to scab. Very strong grower. September to October. Pollination group 2. Triploid. Herefordshire 18th Century

Harry Masters                                                        
Medium to full bittersweet. Vintage quality. Good cropper but can be biennial. October to November. Pollination group 5. Somerset 19th century.

Kingston Black                                                        
Medium sharp category. Vintage quality. Aromatic, distinctive flavour. October to November. In wet areas, can be susceptible to canker and sscab. Pollination group 5. Somerset 19th century.

Major                                                     
Full bittersweet. Vintage quality. Astringent. Very vigorous, good cropper but can be biennial. September to October. Pollination group 5. Somerset 19th century.

Médaille D'Or                                                        
Full bittersweet. Sweet, fruity, very astringent. Vintage quality. One for the connoisseur. Compact tree, good cropper but branches prone to breakage. Pollination group 6 (very late). Normandy 1865.

Michelin                                                       
Medium bittersweet. Sweet, aromatic. Vintage quality. Compact tree, precocious. Usually a reliable cropper but in wet areas prone to canker. Commonly used in Ireland for industrial scale commercial cider (heavily sprayed). October to November. Pollination group 5. Normandy 1872.

Morgan's Sweet                                       
Pure sweet category. Sweet, juicy, sometimes used as an eater. Resistant to scab. September to October. Pollination group 4. Somerset 18th Century

Sweet Alford                                       
Pure sweet category. Good cropper but a bit susceptible to scab. October to November. Pollination group 4. Devon 19th Century

Sweet  Coppin                                    
Pure sweet category. More resistant to scab than Sweet Alford but can be an irregular cropper.October to November. Pollination group 4. Devon 18th Century

Tom Putt                                        
Generally as a cooking apple but also used in cider (sharp). Vigorous. Also used for juice. Very resistant to scab. September. Pollination group 3. Devon 18th Century

Tremlett's Bitter                                        
Cider. Full bittersweet. Slightly susceptible to scab. October. Pollination group 2. Devon 19th Century

Yarlington Mill                                           
Cider apple. Medium bittersweet, vintage quality. Resistant to canker. October to November. Pollination group 4. Somerset

All varieties available November (MM106 and M25 rootstocks only)

 

Crab apples

Malus 'Laura'                              
Ruby red fruit with pink flesh. High in pectin. Ideal for crab apple jelly. Large ornamental pink flowers. Very attractive tree, good for bees.

Available November

 

Apricots

Bare-rooted maiden trees on St Julien A rootstock.

Flavour King                             
Hybrid between plum and apricot. Purple fruit with apricot scent and rich sweet flavour. Makes a very compact tree, possibly suited for container growing. Rather special but requires warm sunny sites, best grown against a wall.
Partially self fertile but also pollinated by early plums (pollination group 1). Pixy and St Julien A rootstocks.

Golden Glow                                                  
Small to medium-sized yellow fruit. Juicy with excellent flavour. Very hardy. Compact tree. Early August. Originates from seedling found growing wild in Worcestershire 1985

Tomcot                                                 
Large orange fruit flushed with red. Sweet with good flavour when fully ripe. Reliable in cool summers. Produces abundance of flowers over long period. Late July. USA 1996

Vigama. Exciting new variety with long flowering period followed by large red fruit. Will succeed out of doors in favourable location (sunny wall best). Container-grown trees only: Single trees €32, 2-9 trees €30 ea

All varieties in stock

 

Cherries

Bare-rooted maiden trees on Gisela 5 (dwarf), Colt (semi-vigorous) or F.12.1 (vigorous) rootstock

Black Oliver                                
Eating cherry. Dark red to black fruit, soft and juicy. Very productive and resistant to canker. Cropping early to mid August.
Not self fertile. (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart, Morello). Colt rootstock only

Celeste                               
Eating cherry. Large dark red fruit, sweet. Naturally dwarf habit. Cropping early to late July. Canada 1990.
Self fertile. Colt rootstock only

Early Rivers                                
Eating cherry. Large, dark red fruit, excellent flavour. Resistant to splitting but susceptible to canker. Very early - cropping mid to late June. Sawbridgeworth 1869.
Not self fertile (pollinators Merton Glory, Lapins, Noir de Guben).

Kordia                               
Eating cherry. Reddish-violet fruit, slightly acidic but sweet. Cropping mid to late August. Czech republic.
Not self fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart, Morello). Discontinued

Lapins Cherokee                               
Eating cherry. Dark red fruit, slightly acidic. Very productive and good split resistance. Cropping late July to early August. Canada 1984.
Self fertile and very good early pollinator.

Merchant                              
Early eating cherry. Dark red fruit with very good flavour. Cropping early to mid July. Norfolk 1976.
Not self fertile (pollinators Merton Glory, Stella, Lapins). Available only on F.12.1 rootstock

Meteor Korai (New)                           
Dke cherry (dual purpose eating and cooking cherry). Duke cherry. Naturally compact but very reliable and productive. Good split and disease resistance. Cropping late June to early July. Originally from Hungary c1970 but developed in the Czech Republic.
Self fertile and good early pollinator.

Merton Glory                               
Eating cherry. Large yellow fruit with a red flush that are often ignored by the birds. Juicy with excellent flavour. Very resistant to canker but susceptible to splitting. Cropping late June to mid July. Surrey 1931.
One of our favourite varieties. Not self fertile (pollinators Black Oliver, Lapins, Merchant, Celest). Available on Gisela 5, Colt and F.12.1 rootstocks.

Morello                                                 
The most popular and reliable cooking cherry, and tolerant of a wide variety of conditions. Excellent for jams and cooking. Cropping late July to early August. Originally bred from Romanian stock. Self fertile. Available on Colt and F.12.1 rootstocks.

Noir de Guben                                
Eating cherry. Dark red or black fruit, juicy with good flavour. Prolific with naturally compact habit. Good resistance to splitting. Cropping late July to early August. Germany.
Not self fertile (pollinators Early Rivers, Lapins, Merton Glory). Available only on F.12.1 rootstocks

Penny                              
Eating cherry. Very high quality almost black fruit, large and firm. Very high yielding. Good resistance to disease. Cropping late August to early September. Kent 1998.
Partially self fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart). Available on Gisela 5 and Colt rootstocks

Petit Noir                              
Eating cherry. The name relates to the size of the tree not the fruit, which is large and black. Good flavour. Cropping August.
Self fertile. Available only on Colt rootstock

Regina                              
Eating cherry. Reddish-black sweet and aromatic fruit. Some split resistance but rather prone to canker. Spreading tree. Cropping mid to late July. Germany.
Not self fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart, Morello). Discontinued

Skeena                              
High quality eating cherry. Dark red fruit, sweet with good flavour. Spreading tree. Cropping early to mid August. Canada 2000.
Self fertile.

Stella                                                
A large dark and juicy eating cherry with good flavour. Very reliable - still one of the best self fertile eating cherries. Cropping mid to late July. Canada 1968. Self fertile, good late pollinator. One of our most popular varieties. Available on
Gisela 5, Colt and F.12.1 rootstocks.

Summer Sun                              
Exceptionally hardy eating cherry. Dark red fruit with exquisite taste and good texture. Crops well in cool conditions but fruit prone to splitting in wet weather.. Cropping late July to early August. Norwich 1970. Partially self-fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart). Available on Colt and F.12.1 rootstocks

Sweetheart                              
Eating cherry. Red, firm, well flavored fruit. Large juicy fruit with great flavour and texture. Begins fruiting at young age. Heavy cropper and good resistance to cracking. Produces fruit over long period. In spite of the profusion of newer varieties, still one of the best choices. Late August to mid September. Canada 1990. Self fertile, good late pollinator. Gisela 5, Colt and F.12.1 rootstocks.

Van                              
Eating cherry. Large black fruit, good flavour. Compact tree. Grown in Norway. Cropping mid to late July. Canada 1944.
Not self fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart, Morello).

Vega                              
Eating cherry. Large yellowy red fruit . Less likely to be eaten by birds. Begins fruiting at young age. Cropping early to mid August. Canada. Not self fertile (pollinators Stella, Sweetheart). Available only on Colt rootstocks.

Except where stated, all varieties available November

Damsons and Bullaces

Available on Pixy rootstock (dwarfing) and also on St Julien A (semi-vigorous)

Damsons
           
Blue Violet                                                  
Sweet and very early damson of plum quality. Suitable for eating fresh or cooking. Originates in Westmoreland in Cumbria, England. Mid to late August. Self fertile.

Delma                                                  
Early  but sweet damson suitable for eating fresh or cooking. Discovered growing wild in southern England in 1997 but now recognised as a distinct variety. Late August/early September. Self fertile.
St Julian A rootstock only

Farleigh Damson                           
Small with blue-black bloom. Extremely reliable. Normally used for cooking but can be eaten fresh if fully ripe. Kent 1820. Self fertile.
Prolific and vigorous, good on difficult sites. The most reliable damson. Mid September. Self fertile. Pixy and St Julien A rootstocks

Hauszwetsche (Sweet Prune)                               
German variety famous for plum cake and fresh eating. Mid September. Self fertile.
St Julien A rootstock only

Shropshire Prune                               
Small hedgerow damson usually used for cooking but very sweet when ripe. Originates Shropshire 17th Century. Mid September. Self fertile.
Pixy and St Julien A rootstocks

All varieties available November

Bullaces
           
Shepherd's Bullace                                                  
Small fruit similar to but slightly more acid than a damson. Generally used for cooking. Very tough and hardy, good in hedges.October. Self fertile.

Available November

 

Medlars

Container-grown trees (3l and 7l pots) on Quince A rootstock

Cultivars

Nottingham                             
Attractive small tree with weeping form. Large attractive flowers. Eat fruit raw when fully ripe or use for cooking. Harvest October

Royal                                                
More upright tree than Nottingham. Fruit reputedly of better flavour. Harvest October

Available November

 

Mirabelles

Mirabelles are midway between the plum and damson, of damson size, and generally very sweet. Can be used for eating fresh or cooking. All varieties listed are available on Pixy rootstock (dwarfing) and also on St Julien A (semi-vigorous)

Countess (NEW)                             
Dark red with yellow-red flesh. Juicy and very sweet. Excellent eating quality. August. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2

           
de Nancy                                                  
Yellow orange with green tinges. Small fruit. Very hardy. France 16th century. Mid to late September. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2.

Golden Sphere                                                 
Large yellow almost translucent fruit with golden sweet flesh. Early to mid September. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2.

Gypsy                          
Large bright red fruit with ornage flesh. Very sweet. Early to mid September
. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2

Ruby                               
The largest of the mirabelles with peach-like flavour and red flesh. Upright in habit. Mid-late September. Partially self fertile. Pollination group 1/2

Available November but supply limited so order early

 

Mulberries

Grafted contaner-grown trees in 7l pots

Cultivars - European

Chelsea
Morus nigra. Old English variety. Very large black succulent fruit. More adaptable to wet clmates than Morus Alba or Morus rubra.

In stock

Cultivars - North American

Capsrum
Morus alba x Morus rubra. Grown in Norther United States and Southern Canada. Large black sweet fruit.

Carman
Morus alba x Morus rubra. Canadian variety (Ontario). Large white coloured sweet fruit. Hardy and very productive.

Illinois Everbearing
Morus alba x Morus rubra. US variety. Black fruit with good flavour. Considered to be one of the best varieties. Long fruiting season.

Italian
Morus alba x Morus rubra. Large black delicious fruit.
Slightly less hardy than the other cultivars.

Ivory
Morus alba x Morus rubra. Canadian variety. Large pinky-white sweet fruit.
Heavy producer.

The supply of these varieties is uncertain at the present time but we hope to have some available early in 2016

 

Necarine

Pineapple. Old variety from Rivers of Sawbridgeworth. Pale-skinned with yellow flesh. Rich aromatic flavour with hint of pineapple. Ripens September. Self fertile. Viewed as a greenhouse tree but will fruit on a sunny wall in a sheltered garden provided some additional protection from rainfall and late frosts is given during winter and early spring. Mentioned in Robert Hogg's Fruit Manual (1884). Maidens on St Julien A rootstock.

Available November

Peaches

Available as maiden trees on St Julien A rootstocks. Peaches are warm temperate fruits and need a south facing wall in sheltered location to do well. Can also be grown under glass.

Rochester                               
Large red and yellow fruit, juicy, very good flavour. Regarded as one of the most suitable peaches for cool temperate climates. Late flowering, so less susceptible to frost. Late August. Self fertile. USA c1900

Saturn                               
Small orange fruit with unusual flat shape. Very sweet and succulent. Late August. Self fertile. This type of peach was originally grown in China hundreds of years ago but was developed commercially in the United States in the late Nineteenth century. Self fertile.

Available November

 

Pears

The trees should be planted in deep, well drained and fertile soil. The month refers to harvesting/eating period. Trees are available on the rootstocks indicated. The most dwarfing is Quince C, followed by Quince A, then Pyrodwarf then Pyrus Kirchesaller and Pyrus communis

Eating and cooking varieties are generally supplied on Quince A rootstock. This is regarded as semi-vigorous. Trees should be planted 4-5m apart. However some varieties that are incompatible with quince are available only on the more vigorous Pyrodwarf, or very vigorous Pyrus communis or Pyrus Kirchensaller rootstocks.

The varieties offered are likely to do well in Irish conditions. However, pears need warmth to ripen fully and ideally should be planted in sheltered sunny positions.

Perry pears are supplied on Pyrodwarf or Pyrus communis rootstock, and should be spaced at 5-10 m. The trees are very long lived - trees planted now may still be producing fruit in two hundred years time! Perry pears need warm sites in order to ripen properly. For more information on perry pears see the link below:

Perry Pears

Trees are normally supplied as bare-rooted maidens. Older trees can be supplied if available, please enquire.

Eating and Cooking Varieties

Baronne de Mello                                
Eater. Renowned for its sweetness and flavour. Hardy reliable cropper with long cropping period but needs a warm site to fully ripen. October to November. Pollination group 3. France 1847. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Beth                               
Eater. Compact tree which spurs freely. Sweet melting fruit. Very suitable for small gardens. September/October. Pollination group 3. Kent 1938. Quince C and Quince A rootstocks

Beurré Hardy                                
Eating. Large, yellowish-green fruit, sometimes with red russet when ripe. Juicy white or pink flesh, sweet and aromatic. Very good flavour. Resistant to scab but does best on south facing wall. October. Poor pollinator (pollination group 4). France 1820.
Quince C and Quince A rootstocks

Black Worcester                                
Cooking pear of ancient heritage. Good for stewing. Large fruit. Productive and very disease resistant. October, will keep till February. Pollination group 4. Worcester 16th Century. Pyrus rootstocks only.

Catillac                              
Cooking pear. Lovely flavour when slow stewed over several hours. Large fruit, green becoming green-yellow with red flush. Vigorous tree with weeping habit. Extremely hardy and disease resistant. Very long keeper. Pick October use January to April. Triploid (pollination group 4). Cadillac, France, 1665.
Quince A rootstock only

Concorde                               
Eater. Compact tree, very reliable, good for organic cultivation. Sweet and juicy. September. Regarded as being self fertile but does much better with a pollinator (pollination group 3). Kent 1977. Quince C and Quince A rootstocks, pyrus rootstocks by special request.

Conference                               
Eater, old favourite introduced here by popular demand. Green with some russet, sweet and juicy, reliable cropper, good on limestone soils. In wet areas a bit susceptable to canker. September, keeps till November. Pollination group 3. Hertfordshire 1885. Quince C and Quince A rootstocks, pyrus rootstocks by special request.

Doyenne du Comice                               
Doyenne du Comice is one of the finest pears. Juicy melting flesh with excellent flavour. However it does need a warm and sunny site. Also suitable for a tall south-facing wall. Fruit ripens October to November. Pollination group 4 (Pollinators Beth, Black Worcester, Catillac, Conference). Angers, France, 1849. Pyrus rootstocks only.

Durondeau                               
Eating. Conical, medium to large fruit, yellow with red flush. Sweet and juicy, slightly acid. Hardy and disease resistant, strong grower and good cropper, does well in moist climates. Another one of our favourites. Late September, will keep till January. Pollination group 3. Belgium c1811. Pyrus rootstocks only

Fontante D'Automne                                                  
Eating. High quality and reliable, resistant to scab and canker. Green turning yellow with pinkish flush and brown russet. Juicy. September, will keep till October. Pollination group 3. France 1825.
Quince A rootstock only

Gorham                               
Eater. Hardy, disease resistant. Sweet juicy flesh, musky flavour when fully ripe. September. Pollination group 4. USA 1905. Quince A rootstock only

Invincible Delwinor                               
Eating/Cooking. Very hardy pear, will suceed where other varieties do not do well. Often produces a second sets of blossom which will miss late frosts. Large fruits, light green, becoming yellow when ripe. Light flavour but exceptionally juicy when fully ripe. September to November. Regarded as self-fertile but does much better with a pollinator.
Good pollinator for other varieties (pollination groups 2-4). One of our most popular pears. France 1992. Quince C and Quince A rootstocks

Jargonelle                             
Very old eating variety. Conical, medium-sized fruit, greenish yellow. Melting, juicy, aromatic. Hardy and disease resistant. One of the earliest pears to ripen (July to August). Triploid (pollination group 2).
Recorded in England c1629 but of ancient heritage - may have been the pear Numidianum Groecum written about by the Roman historian Pliny. Pyrus rootstocks only

Louise Bonne of Jersey                               
Eating. Small to medium-sized fruit, green turning yellow with red flush. Sweet, aromatic. Hardy with good resistance to scab. Pollination group 2. September, will keep to December. France 1780.
Quince A rootstock only

Onward                             
Eater. Late blossom, good for frosty areas. Sweet and juicy, rich flavour. September. Pollination group 4. Surrey 1947. Quince C and Quince A rootstocks

Précoce de Trévoux                              
Eating. Small to medium sized fruit, yellow flushed with red. Exquisite flavour, scented, aromatic. Strong grower and resistant to scab. Good pollinator (p
ollination group 2), but slightly vulnerable to early frosts. One of the very best pears and our favourite. Mid August to early September. France 1862. Pyrus rootstocks only

Shipover (Bollwiller)                                               
Eating/cooking. Rare hybrid of Pyrus communis and Sorbus aria (Whitebeam). Large leaves, felted underneath. Small, delicious fruit. Very disease resistant. August to September. Attractive flowers (pollination group 5).
Bollwiller, France c1610. Pyrus rootstocks only

All varieties available November

Perry Pear Cultivars

Perry pears are only available on Pyrus rootstocks (usually the semi-vigorous Pyrodwarf, but sometimes the more vigorous Pyrus communis or Pyrus Kirchesaller)

Blakeney Red                                 
Mild bittersharp, fair quality. Reliable heavy cropper, good for bulking up the harvest from other varieties. September/ October. Fruit will store for up to 4 weeks. Triploid (pollination group 4). Gloucestershire. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Gin                               
Vintage quality, medium acid. One of the most disease resistant of all the perry pears: very good resistance to scab and canker. May be biennial. Fruit can be stored up to five weeks before milling. October/November. Pollination group 4. Gloucestershire. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Hendre Huffcap                                                  
Low to medium acid, low tannin, pleasant, light quality. Resistant to scab. October, relatively short milling period. Susceptible to silver leaf. Perry pollination group B. Gloucestershire, probably of ancient origin.
Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Judge Amphlet                              
Sharp, low tannin. Very disease resistant. Makes a compact tree. October, fruit needs to be used quickly as does not keep. Early flowering. Pollination group 1. Worcestershire. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Thorn                             
Sharp, low tannin. Very old variety with good disease resistance. Makes compact tree. September/October, fruit needs to be used quickly as does not keep. Pollination group 4. Gloucestershire c1670. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Winnal's Longdon                               
Medium to high acid, low tannin. Good to excellent quality. Very resistant to scab. Grows into large tree. October, relatively short milling period. Perry pollination group B. Herefordshire c1790. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

Yellow Huffcap                               
Medium to high acid, low tannin. Good to excellent quality, rich flavour. High in citric acid. Resistant to scab. Grows into large tree. October, relatively short milling period. Pears should be shaken from tree before fully ripe. Perry pollination group B. Very old English cultivar. The word 'Huffcap' was used in the Middle Ages to describe potent ale. Pyrodwarf rootstock only

All varieties available November

 

Plums and Gages

Available as maidens on Pixy rootstock (dwarfing) and also on St Julien A (semi-vigorous)

Avalon                                           
Eater. Large red plum. Sweet fruit. Strong tree. Bristol 1980. Mid August. Pollination group 2.

Blaisdon Red                                           
Cooking plum, sometimes eaten fresh when fully ripe. Large red fruit, good for jam. Very disease resistant and hardy. Vigorous tree, heavy cropper. Gloucestershire. Mid August. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Cambridge Gage                                           
Eater. Small yellow fruit, juicy with good flavour. Reliable cropper but prefers warm sheltered site. Cambridgeshire 1927. Late August. Partially self fertile (will do better with a pollinator). Pollination group 3.

Coe's Golden Drop                                            
Eater. Large golden gage. Very sweet and juicy. Exquisite taste with hint of apricot flavour. Eratic cropper but can do well in a sunny sheltered garden. Keeps for several weeks after picking. Suffolk 18th Century. October. Pollination group 2.

Denniston's Gage                                            
The most reliable gage. Sweet flesh. Yellow/green, sometimes with red flush. Disease resistant and hardy. USA 19th Century. Late August. Self fertile. Pollination group 2.

Edda                                            
Hardy plum from Sweden (1950) Blue skin with yellow flesh. Excellent flavour. Late July to early August. Not self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Gordon Castle                                     
Very hardy plum from Scotland. Sweet yellow-green fruit. Eater. September. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Guinevere    NEW                         
.Large purple/black fruit. Heavy cropper. . One of the tastiest late plums. Late September/early October. Self fertile (pollination group 3).
Kent 2000.

Haganta    NEW                     
.Large dark blue fruit with golden flesh. Freestone. Lovely scent and excellent flavour. September. Self fertile (pollination group 3). Germany 2005.

Herman                                     
Hardy plum from Norway (1970). Blue/black with golden flesh. Similar in appearance to Czar but tastier. July. Self fertile. Pollination group 2.

Jubilee                                   
Hardy plum from Sweden (1985). Exceptional flavour, similar to Victoria but larger and earlier. Nice compact tree. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.
Our most popular plum in 2013/14.

Kirke's Blue                            
Large purple/blue Plum. Juicy and sweet with excellent flavour. Reputedly good for drying. Bedford 1906. Early September. Hardy and very prolific. Not self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Marjorie's Seedling                            
Large purple plum. Hardy, disease resistant and very reliable. Very sweet when fully ripe. Excellent flavour. Berkshire 1912. Late August. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Opal                           
Medium sized red/purple plum. Hardy and very reliable. Excellent flavour. Late July to early August. Self fertile. Sweden 1925. Pollination group 3.

Oullin's Golden Gage                         
Large golden fruit suitable for eating fresh or cooking. France 1860. Mid August. Self fertile. Pollination group 4. Vigorous.

Reine Claude de Bavay                            
Medium sized green gage with yellow flesh. Possibly the hardiest of the dessert gages. Makes compact tree. Belgium 1832. September. Self fertile. Pollination group 2.

Rivers' Early Prolific  NEW                        
Early eating plum. Hertfordshire c1820. Fruit small but heavy cropping. Late July. Self fertile. Pollination group 2.

Stella's Star                            
Early hardy gage suitable for eating or cooking. Medium sized fruit green turning yellow when fully ripe. August. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Violetta                           
Hardy plum from Sweden (1990). Blue with with sweet yellow flesh. Compact tree. Heavy cropper. August. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

Yellow Pershore                             
Large dual purpose plum. Reliable and good disease resistance. Worcester 19th Century. August. Self fertile. Pollination group 2.

Warickshire Drooper                             
Large dual purpose plum. Large yellow fruit. Very reliable cropper. Gloucester 1920. September. Self fertile. Drooping speading habit. Very ornamental - makes excellent feature tree. Pollination group 2.

Willingham                           
Small yellow/green gage. Good cropping and excellent flavour. Cambridge. August. Self fertile. Pollination group 3.

 

Most varieties available November but please check before ordering

 

Quince

Bare-rooted maiden trees on Quince A (semi-vigorous) rootstock

Cultivars

Aromatnaya                          
Russian variety. One of the sweetest quinces, reputedly can be eaten as a dessert fruit when fully ripe. Hardy and heavy cropping. September. Use October to December. Self fertile but will do better with pollinator (pollination group 2)

Serbian Gold  (syn. Leskovac)                              
Medium to large fruit, good for stewing. Also used for alcohol production in Serbia. One of the hardiest quinces. Highly productive with good disease resistance. Harvest October, use November to February.
Self fertile but will do better with pollinator (pollination group 2/3)

Vranja                                                 
Large aromatic fruit, good for stewing. Vigorous, upright tree. Moderately productive. Harvest September to October, use October to February.
Self fertile but will do better with pollinator (pollination group 2/3)

All varieties available November

 

Fruit bushes and shrubs - Full List

Amelanchier (service berry/saskatoon)

New improved varieties from Canada and Russia. Very tolerant of poor soil conditions (not waterlogging). Thrives on stony, dry soil. For best results plant more than one variety

Amelanchier alnifolia Forestburg                                                 
Canadian selection, grows to 2.5m. Large sweet fruits (16mm), late season

Amelanchier alnifolia  Krasnojarskaja                                               
Russian selection, grows to 4m. Large berries, sweet with slight sourness. Heavy yielding, late season

Amelanchier alnifolia  Pembina                                               
Canadian selection, grows to 3m. Sweet aromatic fruits, heavy cropping

Amelanchier alnifolia  Smokey                                              
Canadian selection. Spreading shrub growing to 4m high and 6m across. The sweetest of all the amelanchiers. Crops over long period

Supply uncertain, hope to have some available autumn 2015

Aronia

Shrub native to Northern Asia and North America, long bred for its richly flavoured berries used in fruit juices and jams, or eaten raw. Important bee plant. Now known to be one of the richest sources of antioxidants, even superior to blueberries, sea buckthorn or gojiberries. Planted commericially in North America, Russia, Poland and Germany (mainly for juice production). Yields are among the highest of any berry: three times that of blueberries and ten times that of goji berries. Aronia juice is starting to appear in health food shops in Ireland, where it often sells for outrageous prices.

Easy to grow with good yields from the second year. An established bush can produce 10-15kg of berries per annum, with production continuing for thirty years or more.

When used as hedging, plant in single rows or staggered double rows, 1.2-1.5m between plants (0.8-1.2m with Hugin). For better yields plant as stand-alone bushes 1.8-2.5m apart with 2.4-3.0 m between rows.

For large scale plantations, it is best to plant out well-developed two year or three year old plants. This ensures rapid berry production at a level that should keep ahead of the blackbirds. Plants should be kept weed free for the first two to three years. Younger plants are generally best grown on in a bed for one year before planting out in their final position. Rich, slightly acid soils are best.

The picking season extends 4-6 weeks (longer if a number of different cultivars are grown), from late August.

Aronia is very frost hardy (won't be killed off by a repeat of December 2010), tolerant of most soils. However, it is not suitable for very exposed maritime situations or waterlogged ground.

Aronia is very suitable for container-growing, though eventually - perhaps at around ten years - it will outgrow even the largest container. Unlike many fruits, it is tolerant of occasional drought. In order to ensure plants do not become pot bound, plants should be repotted every year.

Aronia melanocarpa Hugin                                              
Compact shrub (1-1.2m high) bearing black berries. Bred at the Swedish Agricultural University. Can be grown as low hedge, great for borders round vegetable or soft fruit gardens. Very ornamental foliage in autumn. Not available 2015/16

Aronia  mitschurinii                                             
Russian variety developed by Ivan Michurin, cultivated widely in Russia. Very strong, upright shrub, growing to 4 m in ten years. The most vigorous of the berry-producing aronias. Large sweet and juicy berries. Not available 2015/16

Aronia prunifolia Aron                                           
Vigorous, ornamental cultivar 1.5-2 m high. Big crops of purple-black berries high in anti-oxidents. Very suitable for growing as a (large) fruiting hedge. Not available 2015/16                   

Aronia prunifolia Nero                                          
Vigorous Russian cultivar with big crops of large, sweet, juicy berries, rich in vitamin C. 1.5-2m high. Can be grown as medium-sized hedge or as stand-alone plants. Very ornamental foliage in autumn. In stock all year round           

Aronia prunifolia Viking                                         
Vigorous North American cultivar with big crops of large, sweet, juicy berries, rich in vitamin C. Slightly more vigorous that Nero. 1.5-2.25m high. Can be grown as medium-sized hedge or as stand-alone plants. Very ornamental foliage in autumn. In stock all year round           

Aronia prunifolia Galicjanja NEW                                        
Vigorous cultivar reputedly closely related to mitschurinii. Grown commercially in Baltic states. Big crops of large, sweet, juicy berries, rich in vitamin C. 1.2-1.6m high. Can be grown as medium-sized hedge or as stand-alone plants. Barerooted only, 40-70cm Sold Out  

  

Blueberries

Plants available

Virus-free plants, container-grown in P9 liners (9cm pots), 2l litre pots and 4 litre pots.

The highbush blueberry is the more common type, growing to between 1.6-2 metres high. Next in size is the highbush x lowbush cross, which is about two thirds the height. Finally are the low bush varieties, which more resemble the wild bilberry in size of plant, but with bigger fruit. The tall varieties of blueberry can suffer wind damage in exposed areas, whereas the lowbush are very tough. The hghbush x lowbush crosses are somewhere in between.

Blueberries Highbush (these are the tallest blueberries, typically growing to 1.6-2.0m)

Spacing 0.9-1.5m with 2.4-3.0m between rows (the more compact varieties can be planted closer together)

Cultivars

Bluecrop                                                  
The most common variety, still providing the bulk of the global crop after half a century of dominance. Tall and vigorous with large fruit. Extremely reliable. Cropping late July to late August. Introduced 1941.

Chandler                                                 
A new cultivar with exceptional fruit, introduced to cultivation in 1994. Vigorous upright shrub growing to 1.5m. The berries are tasty, firm and exceptionally big, the biggest ones among the highbush blueberry cultivars, usually over 2 cm across and weighing more than 2 grams. Often yields fruit above 2.5 cm across. Yields are high, spread over 4-6 weeks. Mid to late season. Very suited to small commercial plantations especially those doing pick-your-own. Recommended.

Chanticleer                                                 
Upright shrub growing to 1.6 m. Medium sized berries, slightly acid, transports well. Yields up to 8kg per plant. Early season but late flowering so good for frost-prone sites.

Darrow                                                
Vigorous upright bush. Regular pruning beneficial. Fruit large, aromatic and rich flavoured. Main cropping period late August through to late September, but with some production well into October. Very
tough variety, highly tolerant of extreme weather conditions. Introduced 1965.

Duke                                                 
Introduced to cultivation 1986. Spreading shrub growing to 1.6m, occasionally 1.8m. Performs best when regularly pruned. Clusters of medium sized fruit with good flavour, regular and high yields. Good shelf life and transportation qualities. Less tolerant of wet soils. Early to mid season. In spite of the early fruiting, the flowering period is relatively late, so a good choice for frost-prone sites. Recommended.

Goldtraube                              
Very fast growing and robust cultivar. Berries large and aromatic. Performs well in poor conditions. Fruiting late July to the end of August. Introduced 1971.

Legacy                               
Very vigorous cultivar growing to 2 metres.. Berries medium to large with excellent flavour - one of the tastiest cultivars. Fruiting mid July to mid August. Introduced 1993.

Nelson                               
Introduced to cultivation 1988. Grows into relatively dense shrub up to 1.6 m high. Big fruits, aromatic and very tasty. Yields up to 6kg per plant. Ripe fruit holds on plants (does not drop off). Transports well. Late season (mid August onwards).

Ozark Blue                               
Dense bushy cultivar growing to 1.6 metres.. Berries large and sweet. Good disease resistance. Fruiting mid July to mid August. Introduced 1996.

Patriot                               
Vigorous but smaller cultivar tolerant of wet and heavy soils. Large fruit with excellent flavour. Ornamental flowers and autumn foliage. Early variety - mid July to early August. Introduced 1976.

Reka                               
Vigorous cultivar from New Zealand. Highly recommended owing to its tolerance of higher pH (lesser acidity) in soil. Fruit have excellent storage life once picked. Early variety - mid July to early August. Introduced 1988.
Recommended.

Toro                               
Introduced to cultivation 1987. Upright shrub growing to 2 m. The tallest of the selection offered here, suitable for more sheltered sites. Very attractive pink flower buds opening into pure white flowers. Produces clusters of large firm berries with good flavour. Yields up to 7.5kg per plant. Cropping mid season, same as Bluecrop (which it is now replacing) but more concentrated cropping period. Recommended.

Most varieties available autumn 2015. Please contact us before ordering

 

Blueberries Highbush x Lowbush (Vaccinium corymbosum x Vaccinium augustifolium)

These lower-growing blueberries are more suitable for exposed sites and poorer soil. Generally they are more disease resistant than the highbush varieties.

Spacing 0.75-0.9 m with 1.8-2.4 m between rows (the more compact varieties can be planted closer together)

Chippewa                               
University of Minnesota 1996. Compact shrub with a rather erect habit, up to 1 m in height. Berries pale blue and very sweet when fully ripe. Yield up to 3kg per plant. Early to mid-season. Good in containers.

North Country                                
Bred at the University of Minnesota 1986. Grows to 0.75 m height with very attractive red autumn foliage. Fruits relatively small but aromatic and tasty. Early to ripen. Yield up to 2kg per plant. Tolerant of unfavourable soil conditions. Recommended.

Northblue                               
Bred at the University of Minnesota 1983. Grows up to 1 m high. Medium, occasionally large dark blue fruit, ready mid-season. Good keeping qualities. Yield up to 3kg per plant. Tolerant of unfavourable soil conditions.

Northland                              
One of the the most cold-hardy blueberry varieties. Adaptable to a wide variety of soils and conditions. Spreading bush with medium-sized berries. Quite early - cropping mid July July to mid August. Introduced 1967.

Polaris                              
Introduced to cultivation in 1996. Grows to 1.2 m high, with an erect habit. Berries very tasty, exceptionally aromatic, pale blue, medium size. Early cropping. Yield up to 2.5kg per plant. Very suitable. for container cultivation.

Sunshine Blue                                
Sunshine Blue is a varety developed in New Zealand. It grows to about 1.2m and forms a spreading plant with pink flowers and attractive foliage. The berries are large and tasty, ripening quite late (though not as late as Darrow) . In warmer locations the plant retains its leaves all year round. A lovely ornamental plant ideal for sheltered gardens.

Most varieties available autumn 2015. Please contact us before ordering

Blueberries Lowbush (Vaccinium augustifolium)

Spacing 0.5-0.9m apart with 1.8-2.4m between rows.

Putte                              
Low spreading variety, first developed in Sweden in 1985. Popular in New Zealand. Very hardy and wind resistant. Grows to 40cm. Sometimes used as ground cover. Attractive pink flowers followed by small to medium sizedlsweet berries, ripening late summer. Very suitable. for container cultivation, including baskets. Recommended.

Available autumn 2015. Please contact us before ordering

 

Cornelian Cherry

For best results plant in a warm sheltered location. Supplied as rootballed trees (100-140cm high)

Jolico
A selection with large and freely borne fruits about 24 to 30 mm long and 13 to 20 mm thick. High sugar and vitamin C content. A lovely, undemanding ornamental and wild fruit plant for the processing of fresh fruit juices, syrup, jams, fruit wine, liquor and schnapps.

Schönbrunner Gourmet Dirndl
Another very interesting cultivar arising out of the Higher Federal Learning and Research Institute, Vienna. Similar to Jolico, with large, bright red, slightly pear-liked fruits and the sweetest taste amongst all cultivars. A healthy and robust plant with a high ornamental and economic value.

Available November

 

Cornus kousa chinensis - Chinese Dogwood

More vigorous cousin of the Japanese dogwood, with larger fruits. Good for eating fresh or for making jams and fruit leathers. Suitable for forest garden situations or for growing as specimen bushes.

Suppled as small barerooted trees (100-140cm high) 

Available November

 

Eleagnus umbellata - Eleagnus (Autumn Olive)

 

Hardy fast growing shrub, best known for its tasty edible berries. Popular in hedging and in forest garden projects. Also nitrogen fixing. Very tolerant of seaside exposure. Barerooted plants 30-50cm and 50-80cm. Available November 2015

 

 

Honeyberries (Siberian honeysuckle - Lonicera caerulea var. kamtschatica)

The honeyberry or blue honeysuckle is native to Siberia and other parts of North and North East Asia. The juicy, tasty fruits are highly valued by the indigenous people of Kamchatka.

Related to the native Irish honeysuckle but is a small shrub, not a climber. Grows to approximately 1.5 metres. Produces elongated blue fruit with blueberry/damson flavour, only more acid. In spite of its name, it requres a warm, dry and sunny spot to do well (but tolerant of very low winter temperatures). Plant two or more varieties to ensure good pollination. All varieties fruit very early in the season, typically mid-June. The flowers are very attractive to bees.

The Siberian honeysickles are very winter cold-tolerant but require a sheltered sunny situation to perform well. Vulnerable to wind damage. Prefer well drained moist acid soils high in organic content. The flowers are extremely tolerant of frost.

Varieties

Aurora                              
University of Saskatchewan, parentage: Russian cultivar ‘Solovey’ and Japanese cultivar ‘MT46.55’. Released to propagators in 2012. Erect, thick and compact growth habit, 1.6 m high. Flowers mid May, fruits July/August. Very tasty berries averaging 1.9g. High resistance to disease.

Blue Velvet                               
Compact bush, smaller fruits, ornamental. One of the toughest in terms of wind resistance and tolerance of wet conditions.

Borealis                              
University of Saskatchewan, parentage: Kurile cultivar ‘Kiev#8’ and Russian cultivar ‘Tomiczka’. Released to propagators in 2007. Thick and compact growth habit, 1.2 m high. Flowers mid May, fruit from mid June to early July. Relatively larger fruit, average fruit weight 1.6 g, boxy shape, sweet and tart taste. High resistance to disease.

Honeybee                              
University of Saskatchewan. Russian hybrid (‘Suvenir’ and ‘Blue Pacific’). Selected to be a pollinator for ‘Borealis’, ‘Tundra’ and the ‘Indigo’ series. Fast growing shrub up to 1.8 m high. Fruit from mid June to early July. Very high yields. Disease resistant.

Morena                              
Russian cultivar, 1995. Grows up to 1.5 m high and bears fruit abundantly. Not self fertile. Fruits mid June to early July, spindle shaped, tasty and sweet with a little sourness. Disease resistant.

Tomiczka                             
Russian cultivar, 1987. Grows up to 1.5 m. Not self fertile. Large quantities of small to medium sized berries, sweet and sour. Mid June to early July.

Tundra                             
University of Saskatchewan, 2007. Grows to 1.5m. Not self fertile. Medium sized berries, tangy and sweet. Mid June to early July.

Supply uncertain, hope to have plants autumn 2015

 

Raspberries (Ground cover varieties)

Prostrate raspberries suitable for ground-cover. Ideal for forest gardening projects. Also suitable for orchards. Can tolerate foot traffic. Plant at 2-3 plants per square metre (60-70cm spacing).

All of the varieties listed here will spread rapidly across bare ground from the second or third year. Must be kept weed-free for the first few years. The Rubus Betty Ashburner and Rubus pentalabus (see below) represent the cheapest option for covering large areas.

Rubus Betty Ashburner                            
The defualt ground-cover raspberry. Very tolerant of foot traffic. Will only produce berries when cross-pollinated with other similar raspberries. Not to be confused with the vigorous and invasive Rubus tricolour. In stock all year round

Rubus chamaemorus   'Nyby'                         
Cloudberry. Creeping raspberry, native to upland regions of Northern Europe, rare mountain plant in Ireland. Requires moist acid conditions. Berries highly prized in Scandinavia, where the best spots for picking are closely guarded secrets. Nyby is a Finnish cultivar, high yielding and grown commercially in Scandinavia since 2009. Availability uncertain, hope to have available autumn 2015

Rubus illecebrosus                           
Strawberry-raspberry. Dwarf shrub with thorny stems. Forms dense thicket up to 0.6m high. Not suitable for areas where easy access is required but good for covering exposed banks. Not quite as rapid-spreading as the other rubus listed here. Large red fruit. Availability uncertain, hope to have available autumn 2015

Rubus nepalensis                          
Bristly-stemmed prostrate raspberry native to Himalayas. Tolerant of foot traffic. Attractive white flowers followed by abundant sweet purple-red fruits. Availability uncertain, hope to have available autumn 2015

Rubus  pentalobus                         
Non-bristly prostrate raspberry native to Korea and Japan. Will form dense mat of stems and leaves. Very tolerant of food traffic. White flowers flowed by orange edible berries. In stock all year round

Rubus  tricolour                        
Very vigorous raspberry native to China. Will grow to 1.5 m and can form impenetrable thickets if not kept under control. Invasive. Unavailable (not recommended for ground cover situations)

 

Sea Buckthorn

Named varieties selected for optimum berry production. Both male and female plants are required for successful berry production. There should be at least one male plant within 10-15m of each group of female plants (the female plants produce the berries).

Female  cultivars

Askola
A fast-growing, 4 to 5 m tall shrub, fruiting densely and in abundance;fruits deep orange, medium-large, oval to cylindrical, ripening from end of August, rich in fruit acids, vitamin C and E.
Very tough and vigorous. Tolerant of a wide variety of soils. Needs regular pruning to maintain good shape

Frugana
A strong fast growing growing upright shrub with strong fruiting branches. Unpruned will grow to 4 m in height. Less thorny than Askola. Fruits medium-large, light orange. One of the earliest varieties, ripening from mid August. Possibly less tolerant of wetter soils.

Hergo
A slow growing upright shrub with strong fruiting branches; fruits large, light orange, ripening from early September. Grows well as a hedge. Will tolerate most soils. One of the best cultivars for exposed sites.

Leikora
A broad, upright and vigorous shrub with overhanging fruiting branches, less thorny than Askola. Fruits medium-large, deep orange-red, ripening September/October. High oil content.

Orange Energy
Sturdy growth with wide spreading side branches, moderately thorny. Fruits large, oblong to oval, lightly hairy, bright yellowish-orange, colours solid, dense fruiting already from mid to end September.
Needs regular pruning to maintain good shape

Sirola
A vigorous anjd very robust cultivar with upright growing habit, only slightly thorny. Red-orange berries, pleasantly sweet, fruit stalks  long allowing easy picking, ripening end July to early August. A cultivar that is highly recommended for both domestic and commercial production. One of the most ornamentla of the sea buckthorn varieties - an attractive addition to any garden.

Availability: Please enquire

Male Cultivars

Pollmix 1
Early flowering pollinator, fast growing with upright growing habit, sturdy, almost thornless shoots.
Pollinator for Orange Energy and Sirola

Pollmix 3
Late-season pollinator, flowering latest of the Pollmix group , with a broad, upright growing habit, and weakly thorned.
Pollinator for Askola, Hergo and Leikora.

Pollmix 4
Mid to late pollinator, fast growing with upright habit, almost thornless. Pollinator for Askola, Hergo and Leikora.

Availability: Please enquire